The Doctor of Global Security degree explores the complex global security environment, with a focus on the role actors play in the formulation and implementation of international, bilateral, and state policies and norms, and practices of global scope and concern. The program also addresses the impact of global security issues on domestic security and foreign policy.

The multidisciplinary curriculum integrates research and evidence-based solutions to the complex problems you face in your professional practice, and is designed to prepare you for leadership in the field. Strong emphasis is placed on conducting thorough program and policy evaluations that identify and analyze decisions beyond first order impacts, and on further cultivating your applied research skills at an advanced level. 

This doctoral program embraces a scholar-practitioner model of education. Courses are taught by highly credentialed and experienced instructors, many of whom hold key positions in government agencies or public safety organizations.

Degree Program Objectives

  • Analyze the academic and professional practice of global security.

  • Synthesize the major theories, approaches, and concepts relevant to the global security discipline.

  • Analyze complex issues and challenges related to the global security discipline.

  • Apply theories, approaches, and concepts to real-world examples related to global security.

  • Assess the impact of global security issues on domestic security and foreign policy.

  • Analyze the ideas, beliefs, language, culture, psychology and decision making of actors in the global environment.

  • Design research studies using appropriate qualitative and quantitative approaches for the global security discipline.

  • Operate according to ethical research and professional behavior guidelines in the global security discipline.

Core Requirements (30 semester hours)

  • GLBS710 - Seminar in Global Governance (3 semester hours): This seminar examines the role that global actors play in the formulation and implementation of policy, norms, and practice related problems of global scope and concern. Particular attention is paid to the implications for domestic and international security.  Year 1, Term 1.

    • Analyze the role of actors in global governance

    • Analyze different perspectives on global governance

    • Analyze the impact of global governance on domestic and international security

    • Apply global governance concepts to a simulated real-world setting

    • Operate effectively on a group project

    • Create an executive-level report and briefing on a proposed new global environment

    • Defend arguments on a proposed new global environment

    • Critique the role and participation of peers on a group project

    • Evaluate work presented by peers

  • SSGS711 - Psychology of Actors in the Global Environment (3 semester hours):  This seminar examines the role of theory and applies some of the major psychological theories and approaches, regarding individuals and groups in the global environment. These groups inform the understanding, communication, and decision making of global actors. This is the third program requirement.   Year 1, Term 1.

    • Appraise the role that theory plays in the global environment

    • Assess motivation theories related to political actors at the individual level

    • Evaluate personality theories related to the assessment of individuals

    • Analyze the role that beliefs and images play in decision making

    • Critique theories related to the assessment of groups

    • Differentiate social identity categories

  • DOCT700 - Qualitative Methods (3 semester hours): This course provides an overview of methods used in qualitative research and its theoretical concepts. Elements of the research design such as ethics, developing research questions, sampling techniques, and data collection methods such as observation, interviews, documentary evidence, and audio-visual materials are addressed and applied. Year 1, Term 2.

    • Assess the major research designs used in qualitative or mixed methods research
    • Critique approaches to inference and causality
    • Evaluate approaches to data collection
    • Apply the methods of data collection and analysis in qualitative research
    • Critique qualitative research through critical interpretation of data and analysis
    • Develop skill in using computer assisted qualitative data analysis software to organize, code, and draw connects from data
  • SSGS712 - Nationalism and Identity (3 semester hours): This seminar analyzes contemporary theories of nationalism and identity. Students will examine the complexities of building a nation state: how diaspora groups challenge national identity, subnational groups threaten national cohesion, and gender relations reevaluate social hierarchies.  By utilizing modern case studies across Europe and the Middle East, participants will utilize multidisciplinary approaches to analyze the rise of contemporary nationalism. This is the fifth program requirement. Year 1, Term 2.
    • Analyze theories and approaches to contemporary nationalism

    • Critique concepts related to nationalism and culture

    • Assess concepts of nation building and diasporas creating national identity

    • Analyze approaches related to gender and social hierarchies

    • Evaluate sub-national identities and national identity building

    • Assess theories, concepts, and approaches related to language and national identity

    • Synthesize issues related to nationalism and group identity formation

    • Analyze religion as the basis for national identity

    • Apply select theories, concepts, and approaches to a modern case study

    • Apply theories, approaches, and explain the rise of global nationalism

  • GLBS711 - Seminar in Global Security Issues (3 semester hours): This seminar provides an overview of select current issues of significance to global security faced by actors in the global community, and identifies how these challenges influence domestic and international security. It also focuses on the development of international, bilateral, and state solutions to them. Year 1, Term 3.

    • Analyze current issues in the global security environment

    • Analyze international, bilateral, and state solutions to global security issues

    • Analyze the impact that global security issues have on domestic and international security

    • Analyze arguments regarding global security challenges presented by peers

    • Defend arguments regarding a global security challenge

    • Operate effectively on a group project

    • Critique the role and participation of peers on a group project

    • Create an executive level report and webinar briefing on a global security challenge

    • Apply theory to a global security challenge

  • DOCT701 - Quantitative Methods (3 semester hours): This course provides an overview of the scientific method and methods used in quantitative research, addressing theoretical concepts and practical considerations. The basic elements of quantitative research design are examined and applied, including constructing research questions and hypotheses, defining and measuring concepts, identifying threats to validity and reliability, implementing sampling techniques, and designing research instruments. Experimental design, quasi-experimental design, survey research, and statistical research are covered. Year 1, Term 3. 

    • Examine the purpose of quantitative methods in social science research

    • Explain how to construct research questions for quantitative research

    • Apply causal reasoning and measurement in quantitative research

    • Understand threats to reliability and validity in quantitative research

    • Evaluate the role, purpose, and use of quantitative research designs

    • Apply quantitative concepts

    • Assess the analysis, organization, and presentation of quantitative data

  • DOCT702 – Statistics (3 semester hours): This doctoral seminar provides an overview of basic statistical procedures used in quantitative research and their application. Its focus is to enable students to develop a foundation of basic statistical literacy. Students will assess the role of statistics in quantitative research and develop the competency to perform basic statistical calculations. Both descriptive and inferential statistics are addressed. Statistical concepts involving variables, sampling, analysis of variance, probability theory, inference, and the foundations of multivariate regression are addressed. Students will use gain competence in the SPSS statistical software program. Students will analyze data and research situations to interpret the meaning underlying the data, and how statistics can be used to address important research questions. Year 2, Term 1.

    • Understand terminology used in statistics

    • Examine and apply statistical concepts

    • Examine the basic properties of statistical data

    • Evaluate the role of probability in statistical concepts

    • Evaluate the purpose of hypotheses and their role in the construction of models in statistics

    • Assess the purpose of significance testing in statistics

    • Evaluate correlation and variability of data in statistics

  • GLBS712 - Seminar in Emerging Global Security Issues (3 semester hours): This seminar provides an overview of select emerging complex issues of significance to global security faced actors in the global community, and identifies how these challenges influence domestic and international security.  It also focuses on the development of international, bilateral, and state solutions to them. Year 2, Term 1.

    • Analyze different perspectives on emerging challenges in the global security environment, and implications for domestic and international security

    • Analyze arguments regarding the need to reform or transform the global security environment to accommodate emerging challenges

    • Analyze emerging challenges in the global security environment and implications domestic and international security

    • Analyze arguments regarding emerging global security challenges presented by peers

    • Defend arguments regarding an emerging global security challenge

    • Operate effectively on a group project

    • Critique the role and participation of peers on a group project

    • Create an executive level report and webinar briefing on an emerging global security challenge

    • Apply theory to an emerging global security challenge

  • DOCT715 - Seminar in Strategic Leadership (3 semester hours): This seminar examines classic and contemporary literature on best practices in leadership relevant to developing personal leadership skills, and also on the role of strategic leadership in developing a vision and strategy for an organization. Year 2, Term 2.
    • Analyze the classic literature on leadership

    • Analyze the contemporary literature on leadership

    • Evaluate approaches to creating a vision and strategy for an organization

    • Create a vision and strategy for an organization

    • Evaluate personal leadership skills

    • Apply personal leadership skills in a simulated real-world organizational setting

  • DOCT716 - Seminar in Business and Financial Management (3 semester hours): This course will expose doctoral students to practical research in business and financial management. The emphasis will be on developing an integrated framework for understanding issues in financial management. The course will examine the fundamentals of financial management, models in corporate finance, and contemporary topics in financial research. Topics include the theory of the firm's choice, financial statement analysis, financial instruments, capital markets, project and corporate valuation, global finance operations, and ethics in finance. Year 2, Term 3.
    • Analyze the role that financial management plays in decision making and risk

    • Analyze the role that financial management plays in use of resources and organizational climate

    • Analyze the role that financial management plays in compliance and safeguarding assets

    • Apply financial management concepts to a case study

    • Analyze business management practices

Professional Practice Requirements (6 semester hours) 

  • DOCT703 - Professional Practice I (1 semester hour): During this seminar students will work with their faculty to plan out their semester. The seminar also lays the foundation for peer mentoring between cohorts. Students will be introduced to principles of the research process, collaboration, research ethics, and academic integrity. Year 1, Term 1.

    • Develop a work plan that maps first term requirements and goals
    • Assess ethical issues present in proposed research
    • Integrate information literacy skills into their research practices
    • Develop a concise and specific research question
    • Prepare constructive feedback for peers
    • Implement feedback received by peers and faculty
    • Produce a clear articulation of personal, professional, and research based goals
  • DOCT704 - Professional Practice II (1 semester hour): During the course, students gain familiarity with the professional academic conference circuit, and presentation expectations.  Students will also begin to create their research framework based on dissertation interests. Students will begin background research for their project-based international residency. The course includes professional development for writing. Year 1, Term 2.

    • Appraise the professional conference circuit

    • Evaluate “calls for papers” for conference goodness of fit

    • Assess conference abstracts

    • Differentiate curriculum vitaes from resumes

    • Examine the utility of concept mapping and its role within research planning

    • Develop a concept map based on a research idea

  • DOCT705 - Professional Practice III (1 semester hour): The focus of this course is on final preparations for the 2nd year residency. All students will gain experience developing conference proposals. Peer reviewed presentations and communication skills will be a focus of this course. Year 1, Term 3.

    • Plan a research presentation for an academic conference

    • Synthesize sources as background research for residency

    • Examine conference papers

    • Develop a conference proposal

    • Critique peers through peer review of writing and presentations

    • Demonstrate project management skills through residency preparation components

  • DOCT706 - Professional Practice IV (1 semester hour): Students will begin work on their dissertation prospectus. Students will also finalize their practicum placements and expectations. Students will receive training on the Institutional Review Board for human subjects research as well as on grant writing skills. Year 2, Term 1.

    • Create research question and preliminary literature review for prospectus

    • Arrange practicum placements and establish expectations

    • Apply the tenets of the responsible conduct of research for human subjects research

    • Create a funding proposal based on dissertation research interests

  • DOCT707 - Professional Practice V (1 semester hour): The focus of this course is on portfolio development and on the writing of the dissertation prospectus. Peer review will be critical to this process. Students will work in research groups to hone research design and methodology for dissertation data collection and analysis. Students will craft their portfolio to reflect doctoral learning outcomes and career aspirations. Year 2, Term 2.

    • Draft dissertation prospectus and receive feedback

    • Curate elements of portfolio with self-assessments

    • Refine research methodology skills for data collection and analysis

  • DOCT708 - Professional Practice VI (1 semester hour): Students will complete and defend their portfolio with an oral presentation. In preparation for the dissertation proposal defense, students will give a 3 Minute Thesis-style presentation to articulate the academic and professional practice significance of their dissertation project. Year 2, Term 3.

    • Create oral defense of portfolio to demonstrate mastery of doctoral learning outcomes

    • Critique peers by offering constructive suggestions on oral defense

    • Create 3 Minute Thesis presentation regarding dissertation project

Elective Requirements (9 semester hours)

Select 3 courses from the following:

  • GLBS740 - Technology and Global Security (3 semester hours): This seminar focuses on advances related to science, technology, and innovation in the global environment.  It also examines on the impact that advances in science, technology, and innovation have on domestic and international security, and international, bilateral, and state strategies for addressing them.

    • Analyze the role that science, technology, and innovation play in the global security environment
    • Assess global security challenges related to advances in science, technology, and innovation

    • Analyze international, bilateral, and state strategies for addressing security challenges related to science, technology, and innovation

    • Defend arguments regarding science, technology, and innovation

    • Create an executive level briefing on topic related to science, technology, or innovation

    • Operate effectively on a group project

    • Critique the role and participation of peers on a group project

    • Evaluate work presented by peers

  • GLBS741 - Seminar in Health and Global Security (3 semester hours): This seminar examines the role that global actors play in the formulation and implementation of policy, norms, practice, and domestic and international consequences with regard to current and emerging priorities in global health to address the prevention of disease and the promotion of health. It also examines the impact that global health issues have on domestic and international security, and international, bilateral, and state strategies for addressing them.
    • Analyze the role of actors and the functioning of the global health regime
    • Analyze the impact that global health issues have on domestic, and international security

    • Analyze international, bilateral, and state strategies for addressing global health issues

    • Design a best practices strategy for preventing a global health pandemic

    • Apply global health concepts to a simulated real-world setting

    • Analyze lessons learned from partaking in the simulated real-world exercise

  • GLBS742 - Seminar in Democracy, Governance, Human Rights, and Global Security (3 semester hours): This seminar addresses the role that global actors play in formulation of policy, norms, and practice with regard to democracy, governance and human rights. It also focuses on the impact that these have on domestic and international security, and the international, bilateral, and U.S. strategies for addressing them.
    • Analyze the role of global actors related to democracy, governance, and human rights
    • Analyze issues related to democracy, governance, and human rights

    • Analyze the impact that democracy, governance, and human rights have on international and domestic security

    • Analyze international, bilateral, and domestic strategies for addressing democracy, governance, and human rights issues

    • Create an executive level report and webinar briefing on an issue related to democracy, governance, or human rights, and its impact on international and domestic security

    • Operate effectively on a group project

    • Critique the role and participation of peers on a group project

    • Defend ideas regarding democracy, governance, or human rights, and its impact on global security

    • Evaluate work presented by peers
  • GLBS743 - Seminar in the Political Economy and Global Security (3 semester hours): The seminar examines the role that global actors play in the formulation of policy, norms, and practice with regard to global economic security related priorities such as trade, monetary policy, foreign investment, development, foreign aid, and globalization. It also focuses on the impact that these have on domestic and international security, and international, bilateral, and state strategies for addressing these issues.

    • Analyze the role of that global actors play in the global political economy
    • Analyze issues related to the global political economy
    • Analyze the impact that global political economy issues have on domestic and international security
    • Analyze international, bilateral, and domestic strategies for addressing global political economy issues
    • Design a U.S. strategy and podcast briefing an issue related to the global political economy
    • Evaluate work presented by peers
  • GLBS744 - Conflict Resolution and Security (3 semester hours): This seminar examines different theories and approaches related to conflict.  It also addresses the impact conflict has on domestic and international security.  International, bilateral, and state strategies for addressing these challenges are also addressed.

    • Analyze theories, approaches, and concepts related to conflict

    • Analyze the impact of conflict on the global security environment

    • Assess international, bilateral, and state strategies for addressing conflict

    • Apply theories, approaches, and concepts related to conflict to a simulated real-world setting

    • Analyze lessons learned from partaking in a simulated real-world exercise

  • GLBS790 - Independent Study (3 semester hours): This course is an opportunity to pursue an independent research project on a global security topic under the mentorship and direction of a faculty member. A research proposal and timeline must be submitted in advance of enrollment to the faculty member, and approved by the faculty member and Program Director. 

Residency Requirements (6 semester hours)

  • DOCT720 - Residency: Doctoral Program Foundations (2 semester hours): This course fosters interaction amongst students and introduces them to the Dean, Doctoral Studies Program Directors, Doctoral faculty, the Doctoral Advisor, and support staff. It also provides students an overview of the Doctoral Program and its requirements. Students must complete this course before beginning program coursework. Year 1, Term 1.
    • Operate in a collegial team environment
    • Examine Doctoral Program purpose and objectives
    • Identify Doctoral Program requirements and timelines
    • Explain student support and resources
    • Analyze the role of applied research
    • Identify readiness characteristics that lead to success
  • DOCT721 - Residency: Preparing for the Practicum and Dissertation (2 semester hours): This on-site course fosters interaction amongst student cohorts, program administrators, faculty, and support staff. A detailed overview of faculty research areas, collaborative research opportunities, and the dissertation proposal and dissertation requirements are provided. Students will present their practicum experiential learning plan for approval. With guidance from doctoral program staff, students also choose their dissertation chair. Year 3, Term 1.
    • Operate in a collegial team environment
    • Discuss components of the dissertation process, including the Dissertation Committee, the Dissertation Proposal, Dissertation Seminars and other dissertation requirements illustrated in the Dissertation Manual
    • Present Practicum plan in alignment with requirements

    • Recognize collaborative research opportunities with faculty

    • Compare and contrast faculty research and service interests

    • Identify a Doctoral Committee Chair

  • DOCT723 - Residency: Foreign Experience (2 semester hours):

    This residency involves travel to an international country in order to be exposed    to another country significantly different from the United States. While there, students will collaborate with security related state and non-state officials and will work with a local group on a project related to global security. Students are also exposed to various landmarks that contribute to understanding the foreign culture visited. Year 2, Term 2.

    • Apply academic and professional skills to a focused project in a foreign environment

    • Apply theory to an issue in a foreign environment

Practicum Requirement (3 semester hours)

  • DOCT897 - Practicum (3 semester hours): The Practicum provides a hands-on experience in a professional environment. This is a supervised opportunity where academic skills and knowledge are applied to a professional environment.  Refer to Practicum guidelines in the Doctoral Manual. Year 3, Term 2.
    • Create a Practicum plan
    • Analyze an issue related to the discipline

    • Apply multidisciplinary theories, approaches, and concepts to a real-world setting

    • Analyze lessons learned from partaking in the practicum

    • Produce a self-evaluation of the practicum experience

Dissertation Requirement (variable semester hours)

  • DOCT894 - Seminar in the Dissertation (3 semester hours): This seminar focuses on the framing and writing of part of the dissertation proposal. This includes analyzing and producing a comprehensive description of the problem/research question(s), a literature review, and detailed research design. By the end of this course students will defend their dissertation proposals. Year 3, Term 1.
    • Prepare a dissertation proposal around a discipline related topic

    • Create a description of a problem and associated bibliography

    • Evaluate the body of literature on a discipline related topic

    • Synthesize the body of literature on a discipline related topic

    • Develop a research design which assesses a discipline related research question

    • Evaluate work presented by peers

    • Defend the dissertation proposal

  • DOCT899 – Dissertation (1 semester hour):  The dissertation is a comprehensive document that is an original contribution and one that advances theory, research, and practice in the global security discipline. The dissertation is written under the direction of the dissertation committee and students must be enrolled in the dissertation course to proceed to this stage. All program requirements and the proposal defense must be successfully completed before beginning the dissertation. This is a 16-week course and students must continuously enroll in the course until successful completion of the dissertation and scheduling of the defense. Refer to dissertation guidelines in the Dissertation Manual.
    • Produce a dissertation that advances research in the discipline
    • Defend completed dissertation

Program Milestones

  • Portfolio Defense: This is an oral defense of the portfolio to demonstrate mastery of disciplinary knowledge and the program learning outcomes for doctoral coursework.

  • Dissertation Proposal Defense: This is an oral defense of the dissertation proposal in order to receive dissertation committee approval of the dissertation concept and research plan.

  • Dissertation Defense: This is an oral defense of the complete dissertation at the conclusion of the research and writing process. Students must pass the dissertation defense, make any necessary revisions, and submit the final dissertation to the library before the doctoral degree can be conferred.

Total = 58 semester hours plus continuing registration for dissertation requirement