LSTD502 Criminal Law (3 semester hours)

This course is an advanced theory and practice of criminal law in the United States. The history, scope, and nature of criminal law will be discussed. This course will analyze the general nature of crime, constitutional limits on crime, and general principals of criminal liability. Topics include: legal language and machinery, parties to crime, classification of offenses, act and intent, capacity to commit crime, and various defenses. Primary emphasis will be the common law and modern statutory criminal codes. Students are provided knowledge of the building blocks of criminal law to include elements of crimes and defenses to criminal charges. The role of the police, criminal courts, and attorneys in the administration of the criminal justice system will be discussed in detail. The course will teach the student how to analyze and brief criminal cases and identify and discuss criminal issues. An overview of the criminal process and rules of evidence will be provided. This course focuses on the fundamental principles, concepts, and development of criminal law and the constitutional provisions which govern it. The course further discusses the relationship of the individual to the state and includes an examination of the general framework of criminal law as a means of social control.

LSTD503 Criminal Justice Process (3 semester hours)

This course addresses the specific constitutional rights, including the fourth, fifth and sixth amendments as those that have a direct impact on the defendant and prosecution in the judicial process. The course will review issues of the pre-arrest stage to post conviction remedies, as well as the procedural laws in the criminal justice process and their limits. The parameters of these limits will be analyzed by studying various court decisions.

LSTD504 Methods of Legal Research and Writing I (3 semester hours)

Part one of this graduate level two-part intensive legal writing program is designed to develop students’ research and writing skills. Students will learn and practice the skills necessary for identifying, locating, and using legal resources, including primary sources of administrative, statutory, and case law; secondary authority; and research reference tools, to include computer research tools, commonly used in the practice of law. Students will also explore the process of legal analysis, incorporating the results of their legal research into correspondence, case briefs, legal memoranda, and motions.

LSTD505 Methods of Legal Research and Writing II (3 semester hours)

Part two of a two-part graduate level intensive legal writing program is designed to develop students’ research and writing skills. Students will further develop their research, legal analytical, and writing, with emphasis on logical reasoning and clear, concise, and convincing writing. Students will complete several legal writing assignments, which will synthesize research, analytical, and technical writing skills. (PREREQUISITE: LSTD504 Methods of Legal Research and Writing I).

LSTD506 Property Law (3 semester hours)

This graduate course is an introduction to real property concepts. The course surveys present and future estates in land, ownership, and concurrent ownership. Leasehold interests, gifts and bequests, covenants and servitudes, conveyancing, various land use restrictions, and eminent domain are also considered.

LSTD507 International Law (3 semester hours)

The course is designed to introduce students to the concepts and sources of international law that evaluate the various components, processes, and functions of the international legal process and consider how international law impacts the laws within the United States. Additionally, the current state of the international legal order is reviewed with legal opinions regarding major philosophies, components and current practices and problems of the field of international law.

LSTD508 Contract Law (3 semester hours)

This graduate course is designed to introduce students to the concepts and sources of contract law. This course evaluates the various components of a legally binding agreement or promise and surveys the major issues affecting such enforceable agreements. Students will examine what constitutes breach of contract and the remedies available. The role of contracts in the commercial arena and in society will also be analyzed.

LSTD509 Tort Law (3 semester hours)

This graduate course will focus on the fundamental principles, concepts, and development of tort and personal injury law, while combining theoretical and practical applications of such principles and concepts. The course presents an overview of the substantive law governing compensation for injuries to property and to the person. Specific areas of study include negligence and defenses to negligence; products liability and strict liability; negligent infliction of emotional distress; injury to property; tort immunities and tort investigations. Students will examine the analytical process used both to understand court opinions and hypothetical problems in this area of the law. The course highlights the public policy objectives and social forces behind the development of tort and personal injury legislation.

LSTD510 Constitutional Law (3 semester hours)

This course provides the student with a theoretical foundation in Constitutional law. The Constitution divides power. In particular, it apportions authority along three main dimensions: between the state and federal governments; among the branches of the federal government; and between, on the one hand, all levels of government and, on the other hand, individuals. The vast majority of live constitutional questions concern a conflict along one or more of these axes. Students will study issues of policy, principle, philosophy, and constitutional implications by focusing on construction and application. This graduate course will explore advanced principles, doctrines and controversies regarding the structure of and division of powers in American government. Specific topics include judicial review, jurisdiction, standing to sue, federalism, federal and state powers and immunities, the separation of powers among the branches of the federal government, the First Amendment, and the Equal Protection Clause.

LSTD512 Immigration Law (3 semester hours)

This graduate course focuses on the procedural and substantive law surrounding immigration. Emphasis is given to legal changes enacted in the field since September 11, 2001, as well as current events. It provides students with the background, processes, and tools necessary for a working knowledge of immigration issues. Important topics such as immigrant status, citizenship, refugees, and asylum seekers will be explored. Students will analyze immigration law and policy.

LSTD516 Homeland Security and the Law (3 semester hours)

This course is provides an understanding of the structure of homeland security law and policy. This course will familiarize students with the extensive and complex legal codes that come under the heading of Homeland Security. The course will cover statutes, policy papers, presidential directives, and other documents related to homeland security allowing for an in-depth examination of the foundations of homeland security. The course will provide the student with important legal guidance allowing the student to accurately interpret, understand, and apply homeland security law and policy. The course provides a detailed overview of the subject of homeland security and includes definitions of homeland security, terrorism, the related law, and its development. The course discusses homeland security in other countries as well i.e. Europe, China, Japan.

LSTD517 Law, Ethics and Cybersecurity (3 semester hours)

This course focuses on the ways that law, ethics and cybersecurity overlap and intersect. Besides laws related to cybersecurity, the course examines laws related to intellectual property, civil litigation, criminal prosecutions, and privacy. This examination will provide the means to identify and analyze the policies reflected in those laws. Those policies could guide the creation of policies on a business-level, using qualitative risk assessment and planning. An exploration of ethics and cybersecurity, as well as of workplace ethics, will involve the use of an ethical framework.

LSTD601 Sports Law (3 semester hours)

This course is an introduction to sports-related legal issues and concepts. Its focus is on providing an overview of the major legal issues associated with sports, sports management, and the sports industry. Students will conduct research, read, and write on issues associated with the sports legal industry. Topics include but are not limited to discrimination, legislation, regulation and rights, competition, contract, labor, tort and trademark law, and administrative, antitrust and constitutional law.

LSTD690 Independent Study: Legal Studies (3 semester hours)

This Independent Study is an opportunity for Legal Studies graduate students to pursue an independent research project under the mentorship and discretion of a faculty member. The course requires a major research paper; there will be no examination. Students will submit a request to take the independent study to the Registrar and will include the name of a faculty with whom they have coordinated. Prior to registering, students should first contact the professor with whom they wish to mentor their independent study, coordinate an agreement on the grading requirements, and then NOTIFY their academic advisor with the name of their professor. The final approval to take the independent study will be made by the Program Director.

LSTD699 Legal Studies Capstone (3 semester hours)

Preparation for the Legal Studies Master’s Thesis Seminar begins on day one of a student's graduate program of study. The theories, research methods and analytical skills, and substantive knowledge obtained through their Masters curriculum provide the basis for the Master’s thesis. Students will support the thesis effort, including gathering bibliographic and reference materials on the thesis topic including developing individual course research papers that may become sections of the final Master’s thesis. Students will address the requirements as described in the syllabus and classroom assignments. The Master’s thesis proposal shall be prepared in accordance with the standards of the academic discipline. The Master’s thesis proposal must provide a clear and lucid description of a legal issue and a proposed method of analyzing of the problem. Guidance on the format of the research seminar proposal and a sample proposal are contained in the APUS Thesis Manual. NOTE: This course may not be taken until all other courses are COMPLETED and student has a 3.0 GPA.THIS COURSE IS 16 WEEKS.