HIST500 Historical Research Methods (3 semester hours)

The course addresses the development of core research skills for advanced historical study. Through case studies analyses, the evaluation of different types of historical evidence, and the consideration of how valid research questions are formulated and applied, it is designed to refine the critical thinking, research, and writing skills that are fundamental to valid historical scholarship.

HIST501 Historiography (3 semester hours)

This course is the study of historical thought from its emergence in the classical world to the present. Students concentrate on how history has been interpreted, rather the facts of history themselves as well as contemplate the fundamental questions about the nature of history, and investigate the relationships between theory and evidence in historical writing. Emphasis is on the narratives historians have used to reconstruct the past, and the major historiographical schools of thought that have developed over time.

HIST510 Graduate Seminar in World History (3 semester hours)

This course is a comprehensive seminar in world history designed to provide a foundation in historical theory, trends, and concepts for further study of topical history at the graduate level. Students examine the broad sweep of world history, major interpretive questions in world historiography, and major periods of interaction between civilizations. This course is not designed as a refresher of undergraduate history survey courses; rather, it is a concentrated study of world history for serious history students and professionals.

HIST520 Graduate Seminar in U.S. History (3 semester hours)

This course is a comprehensive seminar in U.S. history designed to provide a foundation in U.S. historical theory, trends, and concepts for the further study of specialized and topical history at the graduate level. Students should be expected to read and write intensely on both broadly and narrowly addressed topics of history. This course is not designed as a refresher of undergraduate history survey courses; rather, it is a concentrated study of U.S. history for serious history students and professionals.

HIST521 Seminar in Public History (3 semester hours)

The Seminar in Public History examines the varied and interdisciplinary "field" of Public History--such as community/local history, historic preservation, archives, historical archaeology, museum studies, business and policy history, documentary editing and publishing, and documentary films--through readings, class discussions, occasional guest speakers, and occasional field trips. The central theme explores some of the many ways people create and convey history, some of the major themes in community and social history, and the problems and possibilities of working as historians in public settings.

HIST522 Archives and Manuscript Management (3 semester hours)

This course examines the theory and practice of managing archival documents, such as personal papers, institutional records, photographs, electronic records, and other unpublished materials. Topics include: manuscript and records acquisition and appraisal, arrangement and description, conservation and preservation, reference, and access. The course provides in-depth study of current issues and practices in archives, addressing fundamental problems, theoretical principles, techniques, and practical administration of archives and manuscripts; the importance of records in the modern information age; discussion of the types and varieties of archival repositories and the value of historical records beyond traditional research use.

HIST523 Theory and Practice of Oral History (3 semester hours)

This course explores oral history as a research methodology and studies the current “historiography of oral history.” The topics examine how oral history projects are initiated, how projects are administered, how interviews are conducted, and how oral history interviews are preserved and made available to researchers. Special emphasis is on the use of technology in making oral histories available to researchers on the Web. Students will gain practical experience in oral history interviewing and related aspects of oral history, such as transcribing, editing, and publishing oral histories.

HIST525 West Virginia History and Culture (3 semester hours)

This course is an historical survey of West Virginia and the Central Appalachian’s development from prehistoric times to the present time. Areas stressed include Native American settlements, colonial migrations, revolutionary activities, Civil War and statehood, industrialization, and the region’s assimilation into the national economy.

HIST531 The Greek Civilization (3 semester hours)

This course is a study of Greek civilization from its beginnings to the collapse of the independent city-states in the 4th century BC. Emphasis is on ancient Greece’s constitutional, political, economic, social, diplomatic, military, artistic, philosophical and intellectual dynamics. Key topics include the Greek way of land and naval warfare, maritime trade and the economy, Peloponnesian and Persian Wars, the "Age of Pericles" and the Classical Age of Athens, the rise and fall of Spartan power, the rise of Athenian democracy, and the impact of Ancient Greece on the evolving Western Civilization.

HIST532 The Roman Republic and Empire (3 semester hours)

This course is a study of Roman civilization from its beginnings to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century AD. The course emphasizes ancient Rome's constitutional, political, economic, social, diplomatic, military, naval, maritime, artistic, architectural, engineering, legal, philosophical and intellectual dynamics. Key topics include the Roman way of land and naval warfare, maritime trade and the economy, Punic and Gallic Wars, imperial expansion, transition from Republic to Empire, the Imperial system, Republic and Imperial constitutions, and the impact of Ancient Rome on the evolving Western Civilization.

HIST533 Late Antiquity and Byzantium (3 semester hours)

This course covers the period from the eighth century B.C. colonization of the Mediterranean and the founding of the Byzantium seaport in 667 B.C. through the First and Second Golden Ages, to the fall of Constantinople in 1453 to the Ottoman Turks. The roles of great Byzantium leaders such as Constantine the Great, the spread of Christianity throughout the Roman Empire, the recapture of Constantinople from the crusaders, and the impact of Byzantium culture on Western intellect are studied.

HIST534 Medieval Europe (3 semester hours)

This course is a study of European social, political, economic and religious institutions and cultural and intellectual phenomena in the light of the changing historical environment from the end of the Ancient World to the Renaissance. Students examine major milestones from roughly 300 to 1500 AD. Special emphasis includes the importance of the Crusades, development of the Mediterranean as an important venue for the exchange of goods and ideas, and changes in medieval military organization, strategy and technology.

HIST535 Renaissance and Reformation (3 semester hours)

This course examines the history of the Renaissance as a European wide movement emanating from the Italian peninsula; the crisis of the church medieval and the rise of the Renaissance papacy; Humanism, with special emphasis on the great painters, architects, and sculptors; the Renaissance city-states, Machiavelli, and the Renaissance monarchies of France, England, Spain, and the Holy Roman Empire; the continuing crisis of the church medieval and the religious upheavals of Protestantism; the work of Luther, Calvin, Zwingli, and the Anabaptists; the Catholic Reformation; the age of civil and religious wars.

HIST536 History of the Enlightenment (3 semester hours)

This course is a study of the major social, political and cultural changes in Europe from the death of Louis XIV to the fall of Napoleon. Topics include the intellectual history of the Enlightenment, the causes of the Revolution, the development of radical ideologies, social and political instability, the French impact on Europe, and the achievements of Napoleon as civil administrator, military strategist, and commander.

HIST543 18th and 19th Century Europe (3 semester hours)

This course investigates the intellectual, social, and economic history of Europe from the Glorious Revolution of 1688 to the onset of the Great War in 1914. The major focus is on the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, the Age of Ideologies, and the new imperialism prior to the World War I. While emphasizing the intellectual history of Europe, the course also investigates the social and economic structure of 18th and 19th century Europe.

HIST551 The American Revolution in Context (3 semester hours)

This course is a comparative study to demonstrate the importance of the historical context of any great military event. Context includes all aspects of a society or culture and in this case, 18th century British and colonial American political and constitutional philosophies, social norms and societal structure, economics, religious concepts, and foreign and diplomatic policy. Students examine issues such as divergent historiographical opinions on the degree of American constitutional conservatism versus political and social radicalism, and the nature of the soldiery of the continental Army.

HIST552 The Civil War: Seminal Event in American History (3 semester hours)

This course is a study of the political, economic, cultural, and social aspects of the Civil War as a seminal event in our nation’s history. Students explore the causes of the war, how a nation coped with the struggle across multiple dimensions, and how we dealt with the conflict's aftermath. Special emphasis is on the continuing debate that the impact of the Civil War had on both the North and the South.

HIST553 History of Colonial America (3 semester hours)

This course will examine the political and social history of the thirteen colonies, including their European background, settlement and expansion, beginnings of culture, and the imperial context. Additionally, students will study the social consequences of colonization, migration, and war in America from 1500-1775, including the interaction of British colonists with competing European cultures (French, Dutch, Portuguese, and Spanish), with Native Americans, and with African and Afro-American slaves. The course will also include consideration of the pan-Atlantic context of Early America, cross-cultural contacts, family and gender, labor systems, religious observations, crime, and other themes explored in recent social and cultural theory. Recommended Prerequisites: HIST500 Historical Research Methods and HIST501 Historiography.

HIST554 History of the American West (3 semester hours)

This course will explore the history of the trans-Mississippi West from the 16th century to the present. Included will be the numerous historical issues associated with the region, including cultural contact and conflict, economic development, visions and meanings of the West, human interaction with nature and the environment, relationship between western states and the federal government, tourism, the growth of the sunbelt cities, and the shifting nature of race, class, gender, and power in the region. Recommended Prerequisites: HIST500 Historical Research Methods, and HIST501 Historiography.

HIST555 The United States in the 20th Century (3 semester hours)

This course examines the changes in American society at the end of the 19th century as it confronted the issues of industrialization, immigration, and urbanization. It explores the open conflict between the advocates of isolationism and collective security and studies the impact of World War I. It also studies the changing values of the 1920s, the stock market crash of 1929, the Great Depression, and the cultural, social, political, military, and economic growth of the United States from World War II to the present.

HIST556 U.S. Constitutional History (3 semester hours)

This course examines the origins, content, and judicial interpretations of the U.S. Constitution. The course involves study of the Supreme Court’s evolving decisions on such issues as States’ rights, civil rights, the Commerce Clause, Due Process in criminal and other proceedings, and protected freedoms (speech, religion, assembly, etc.) under the Constitution.

HIST557 History and Popular Culture (3 semester hours)

This course explores the history of expressive and material cultures around the world, with emphasis on industrialized nations. Topics include aesthetics, social identification, and production, consumption, and reception of cultural forms. Using literature, films, pictures, and music, students study theories of popular culture and aesthetic hierarchy; explicate historical contexts of artistic movements; discuss cultural imperialism; address problems of cultural appropriation, creativity, and identity; and examine cultural expressions of social difference and deviance. Topics also include the social history of culture in the age of mass society, including popular arts and the culture of consumption.

HIST558 The Great War (3 semester hours)

This course examines the origins of World War I; the combatants, strategy and tactics, technological innovation vs. conservatism; the war in France; the war at sea; America's role; the peace settlement; and the occupation. While military aspects of the conflict are studied, the primary focus places the Great War in the context of European and World history, and specific areas include political and diplomatic developments, new developments in weapons technology, economic aspects of the war, and the impact of the war on the culture and social order of the nations involved in the struggle.

HIST560 World War II in Context (3 semester hours)

This course is a global history of the Second World War. Emphasis is on the theaters of war and related events in Europe, Africa, the Middle East, Southeast and Southwest Asia, the Pacific, and Latin America in relation to their impact on the national and military objectives. In this context, students compare and contrast the economies, industry, society, and culture of the United States, Great Britain, Japan, and Germany as major participants during the war. The role of diplomacy and strategy, the impact of war upon society, and the fighting on land, at sea, and in the air are also examined in terms of modern warfare.

HIST570 Modern European History (3 semester hours)

This course analyzes modern European history emphasizing its political, intellectual, social, and cultural history from the end on the nineteenth century to the near present day. Key concepts that may be covered are nation-building, empire-building, state-building, the development of ideologies, industrialization, urbanization, ethnic nationalism, and globalization.

HIST571 History of Africa (3 semester hours)

This course will analyze various aspects of African Civilizations including the conflicts and historical development of various pre-colonial African kingdoms to the rise the Slave Trade. In addition, emphasis will focus on the development of the plantation economy in the West, changes in the conduct of the slave trade and its impact on African economic, social, and political history. Recommended Prerequisites: HIST500 Historical Research Methods, and HIST501 Historiography.

HIST572 History of East Asia (3 semester hours)

This course examines the major trends in the development of civilization in East Asia from prehistory to the end of the sixteenth century. While East Asia is generally understood to comprise China, Korea, Japan, and Vietnam, due to limitations of time, the course will focus primarily on developments in Chinese history and their impact on the wider region. At the same time, careful attention will be given to ways in which the smaller nations of the region, Japan in particular, creatively modified the foundations of Chinese civilization so as to create a distinctive civilization of their own. Recommended Prerequisites: HIST500 Historical Research Methods, and HIST501 Historiography.

HIST573 History of the Middle East (3 semester hours)

This course will explore the Middle East by examining its history, politics, and culture while keeping an eye on the wide variety of individual experience of those living in the Middle East. Included in this process, students will focus on how Middle Eastern peoples have adapted to their physical environment as nomads, city dwellers, empire builders, and developed agriculture. In addition, this course will examine the rise of Islam, the Arabic conquests, early empires and their continuities with the Pre-Islamic past. Recommended Prerequisites: HIST500 Historical Research Methods, and HIST501 Historiography.

HIST581 The Great Revolutions (3 semester hours)

This course compares and contrasts revolutions recognized as monumental in scope and/or consequences they are labeled "great"; specifically, the American, French, Mexican, Russian, Chinese, Cuban, Vietnamese, and Iranian. Students examine their causes and consequences, to include the transformation of economic, social, and political systems of social stratification. Of particular interest is the relationship among the structural and intentional elements, the impact of revolutionary crisis in a society, and various insurgent challenges to the ancient regime.

HIST586 History of Science (3 semester hours)

This seminar explores past and recent historiographical approaches within the history of science. Students examine a wide variety of topics primarily from the 17th through the 21st centuries, to include the fields of physical sciences, natural history, and medicine. Emphasis is placed on deciphering various theoretical approaches; the pros and cons of different research questions, subjects, and sources of evidence; and what makes the history of science valuable to our understanding of global change.

HIST588 History of Religion (3 semester hours)

This course explores the historical development and central beliefs and practices of each of the major world religions. Students employ a multi-disciplinary approach to religious study (e.g., the use of literary criticism, anthropology, psychology, phenomenology and other tools) to examine the importance of religious thought and expression within each religion. The scope of the course is international, and each religious movement is approached from both a chronological and geographical perspective.

HIST597 Graduate Seminar in European History (3 semester hours)

This course is a comprehensive seminar in European history designed to provide a foundation in historical theory, trends, and concepts for further study of topical history at the graduate level. Students examine the broad sweep of European history, major interpretive questions in world historiography, and major periods of interaction between civilizations and empires. This course is not designed as a refresher of undergraduate history survey courses; rather, it is a concentrated study of European history for serious history students and professionals.

HIST611 Ancient Warfare (3 semester hours)

This course is a study of warfare in the ancient world with emphasis on the great empires of the Near East and the Mediterranean, particularly the Greeks and Romans. Student examine the origins of warfare in the Neolithic period to the decline and fall of the Western Roman Empire in the fifth century. Special emphasis will be placed on the military history of Mesopotamia and the Near East (Sumerian, Akkadian, Babylonian, Hittite, Assyrian and Persian), Egypt (Old, Middle and New Kingdom), Greece (Mycenaean, Archaic, Hellenic and Hellenistic) and Rome(Republican and Imperial). The phalanx, the legion, Greek Fire and the importance of roads are discussed in detail.

HIST634 History, Theories, and Contemporary Issues in Historic Preservation (3 semester hours)

This course examines the history, theory, and current issues of preservation practices in the United States and beyond. The themes center on the historical roots of preservation, rather narrowly focused on repairing old buildings, and the modern, broad field of preservation in terms of individuals, societies, and cultures and their relationships to the built environment and cultural landscape. Special emphasis is on the multidisciplinary nature of the preservation field and the public nature of its practice.

HIST635 Museum and Exhibition Culture (3 semester hours)

This course is a study of objects, buildings, and landscapes and how to evaluate their contexts of display through three-dimensional stories over the course of two centuries, drawing mainly on examples in the United States. Students examine issues such as the relationship of collections and landscapes to identity; the intersection of commerce and culture; and the influence of museums on intellectual culture. Key themes focus on the role of museums and exhibitions in preserving a view of the past and developing an image of progress; and how they change in response to the various contexts in which and for which they exist.

HIST636 History and Digital Preservation (3 semester hours)

This advanced course explores the nature of the Web for historical research. Students will be exposed to techniques for evaluating and discovering “trusted” resources, as well as participation in related scholarly communities. In addition, the class provides theoretical underpinnings for the digitization of analog materials and controls for “born-digital” resources as part of a preservation program. Topics to be explored include: selection for preservation, copyright issues, digital longevity, formats and strategies for preservation, metadata to support digital preservation, maintaining the integrity and authenticity of digital materials, management of digitization and digital preservation programs, risk management, and disaster recovery.

HIST642 Nazi Germany and the Holocaust (3 semester hours)

This course offers a study of the origins and history of the Holocaust within National Socialist Germany and throughout Eastern Europe. Students examine the organizations involved at the grass roots level as well as the escalation of events from open murder to the implementation of concentration and death camps. Topics include the birth of National Socialism through the final days of the Holocaust, including the political, social, economic and scientific contributions during the Third Reich.

HIST643 The Ottoman Empire (3 semester hours)

This course investigates the roots of the Ottoman people, the development of their empire, the spread of their culture and their impact on early modern Europe. Students examine the reasons why the Ottoman Empire was one of the most successful empires in the history of the world. Starting in a corner of Anatolia with Byzantine and Seljuk lands in the 13th century, the emphasis is on how the Ottomans managed to expand their authority until they controlled territory on three continents: Asia, Europe and Africa until its demise after World War I.

HIST645 Russia and the Soviet Union (3 semester hours)

This course investigates the political, economic, diplomatic, and cultural history of Russia and the Soviet Union, including the decline of Imperial Russia, the Revolution of 1917, and the collapse of the Soviet Union up to the present. Special attention is given to the characteristics of Imperial Russia at the beginning of the twentieth century, the causes and course of the Russian Revolution, the Soviet system under Stalin; the Great Patriotic War, the post-Stalinist liberalization, the Cold War, the collapse of the USSR, the emergence of the post-Soviet republics, and developments in contemporary Russia.

HIST651 America's Indian Wars (3 semester hours)

This course is an in-depth study of the westward expansion of Europeans and the United States from colonial times to the 1890s as it resulted in military conflict with the Native American Indian tribes living between the Atlantic and the Pacific oceans. Students focus on the military strategy and tactics, leaders and groups, economic conditions, diplomatic efforts, and cultural conflicts.

HIST652 African-American History (3 semester hours)

This course is a study in the history of African-Americans in the United States, with emphasis on the social forces underlying transitions from West Africa to the New World, from slavery to freedom, and from rural to urban life. Topics include the Atlantic slave trade, American slave societies, maroon communities, free blacks in the antebellum United States, Reconstruction and free labor, colonization, emigration, and urban migrations.

HIST653 History of American Women (3 semester hours)

This course is a study of the historical experience of women in America from the colonial period through modern times. Topics include the evolution of women's work, education, legal and political status, religious experience and sex roles as well as age, class, race, sexual preference and region as significant variables in women's experience.

HIST657 Antebellum America: Prelude to the Civil War (3 semester hours)

This course is an analysis of the conditions existing in the United States in the first half of the 19th century. The course focuses on the political, cultural/social, economic, security, leadership, and other issues that played roles in starting and shaping the Civil War. Students will analyze the issues in the context of war and peace to determine whether or not such conflicts as civil wars can be avoided prior to their inception.

HIST658 Reconstruction and Post-Civil War America (3 semester hours)

This course is designed to examine the interrelationship between the Presidents Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson and the U.S. Congress, compare/contrast the Reconstruction plans developed by both, and determine why the Reconstruction Period played out in the manner that it did.

HIST670 History and Culture of Latin America (3 semester hours)

This course examines the heritage of Latin America from pre-Columbian civilizations (Aztec, Maya, and Inca) and Iberian colonial patterns, through the independence movements of the early 19th century, and the global relationships that oriented the region toward Europe and the United States. Purpose is to distinguish early Latin American history, from the arrival of the first peoples on the American continents through the 19th century, and Latin American culture, economics, and politics.

HIST680 Special Topic: History (3 semester hours)

HIST680: This course, when offered, is a one-time offering on an area of special interest that will vary each term. These are open to graduate students as an elective, or to fulfill concentration requirements.

HIST690 Independent Study: History (3 semester hours)

This course is an opportunity for History students to pursue an independent research project or examine a specific area of history under the mentorship of a single professor. Students must complete 24 credits of study before taking this course. The course will typically involve a major research paper; there will be no examination. Students will submit a proposal prior to the start of the project, and a rough draft of the paper, both of which will count toward the final grade. Prerequisite: University approval and Upper Level standing. Prior to registering, students should first contact the professor with whom they wish to mentor their independent study, coordinate an agreement on the grading requirements, and then NOTIFY their academic advisor with the name of their professor.

HIST691 Writing a Thesis Proposal (3 semester hours)

Preparation for the Master of Arts in History Capstone (Thesis) seminar begins on day one of a student's graduate program of study. The theories, research methods and analytical skills, and substantive knowledge obtained through their master's curriculum provide the basis for the thesis project. Students are required to develop primary and secondary source materials on their research topic and address the writing requirements as described in the syllabus and classroom assignments. The thesis proposal must provide a clear description of a question or problem and a proposed method of answering the question or solving the problem. Guidance on the format of the research proposal and a sample proposal are contained in the APUS Thesis Manual.This course should be the LAST course in your program prior to HIST699 and should not be taken earlier in your program.

HIST696 Practicum in Applied History (3 semester hours)

The experiential or practical component of the course aims to apply learning in an aspect of interest related to the degree and concentration in Public History. It is understood to be a supervised practicum that requires approval by APUS before entering into the relationship with the organization. The selection of an organization or site for the practicum must relate to the content of the student’s course work and/or concentration. Goals of the applied practicum and integration seminar will be submitted by the student for approval using an application for approval to the Faculty member, Program Director and Dean of the School, Arts and Humanities. The organization will serve as an opportunity to experience the practice of an area of management related to the focus of the student’s degree. Practicum courses are NOT included in the university retake policy. All grades for any attempts will appear on transcript and will be calculated in GPA.

HIST698 Comprehensive Exam in History (0 semester hours)

THIS COURSE WILL REQUIRE A TEST PROCTOR.This course prepares graduate students for the Comprehensive Examination in the Master of Arts in History program. The purpose of this course is to provide a structured weekly review of key concepts, theories, and knowledge skill sets in their degree and particular concentration. Students are required to submit responses to a number of assignments over the course period prior to taking the exam. Students apply historical methodology in preparation for the exam and consult texts, journal articles, print & media reports, and documentaries, as well as collaborate with other students enrolled in the course to help them prepare for the exam. Assignments serve as a means of final preparation for the student and calibration with the course instructor, who will grade the exam. IMPORTANT: You must have COMPLETED all other courses in the program and have a GPA of 3.0 in order to register for this course. As a History student, you must pass this comprehensive exam in order to have your degree conferred. The comprehensive exam must be taken by the course end date or a failing grade will be posted. If you fail your first course attempt to pass the comprehensive exam, you will need to get approval to register for a second attempt of the course and BOTH final course grades will show in your transcript.

HIST699 Master of Arts in History - Thesis (3 semester hours)

Preparation for the Master of Arts in History Capstone (Thesis) seminar begins on day one of a student's graduate program of study. The theories, research methods and analytical skills, and substantive knowledge obtained through their master's curriculum provide the basis for the thesis project. Students are required to develop primary and secondary source materials on their research topic and address the writing requirements as described in the syllabus and classroom assignments. The thesis proposal must provide a clear description of a question or problem and a proposed method of answering the question or solving the problem. Guidance on the format of the research proposal and a sample proposal are contained in the APUS Thesis Manual. This course may not be taken until all other courses are COMPLETED and student has a 3.0 GPA. Capstone courses are 16 weeks long and cannot be taken along with any other course. Prerequisite: HIST691.