EDUC500 Philosophy of Education (3 semester hours)

This course explores the underlying principles and philosophical foundations of teaching and education and examines how teachers function on the basis of a set of assumptions and beliefs regarding what they teach, how they teach, and to what end they teach. Candidates will consider the origin, tensions and arguments surrounding the character of American education. They will also explore their own assumptions and gain a critical understanding of the philosophical foundations by entering into conversation with others that have also engaged in a deep exploration of the perennial human questions as they pertain to the conceptualization and practice of education. Prominent philosophies that underlie current educational thought and practice of education/teaching are also examined.

EDUC501 Human Growth and Development (3 semester hours)

This course examines theories of child, adolescent, and young adult development and learning. It introduces a comprehensive view of human development across the lifespan, drawing on the application of major theoretical positions - both historical and current. Developmental themes are discussed in terms of their application to typical and atypical human development in children, adolescents, and young adults. Concepts related to the significant role that transitions play in development throughout the lifespan will be integrated throughout the course. Application of theory to the school setting in the areas of learner development, learner styles/differences, the nature of the learner, and learner motivation are discussed. Topics also include the impact of culture and diversity on learning.

EDUC502 Foundations of Curriculum and Instruction (3 semester hours)

The Foundations of Curriculum and Instruction course focuses on applying curricular theory to best practices to the 21st century classroom setting. Planning for instruction and evaluation of learning are the two focal points of this experience. This course is designed as an introduction to the systematic process of planning for effective classroom instruction and assessment, as these tasks relate to contemporary curricular concepts. The skills needed for writing learning objectives and instructional plans for various domains of learning will be taught by placing an emphasis on setting goals and objectives for instruction; planning activities and assessments based on cognitive, social, affective, and psychomotor factors; and designing appropriate means of assessing those learning objectives. Special attention will be given to the related use of technology in the development of effective and systematic learning environments in the 21st Century classroom. This will include a basic recognition of computer hardware and software, capabilities and limitations of technology, evaluating programs and technological resources, and the effective use of various technologies in the classroom.

EDUC503 The Professional Educator (3 semester hours)

This course is intended to provide individuals with the knowledge and skills needed to succeed in the Master of Education program. Students will explore what it means to develop as a professional educator and how this impacts teaching and learning. The course examines the significance of various educational theories, historical developments, philosophies, pedagogical approaches, basic research designs, and educational paradigms. Students will discover how different social, emotional, physical, and ethical issues impact various aspects of K-12 classrooms, and other instructional settings. Effective use of technology as a tool in educational situations will be emphasized, as well as how educational research can alter classroom practice.

EDUC504 Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment (3 semester hours)

This course examines curriculum, instruction, and assessment in the context of various standards and accountability and their relationships to improvement in student learning, based on sound pedagogical approaches. The importance of alignment to learning outcomes and the necessity for valid assessments are discussed. Methods for collecting various assessment data; analyzing assessment data; creating campus curriculum and instruction goals; and implementation issues related to accountability, planning, and collaboration are addressed. The use of technology to assist with accurate assessments is presented.

EDUC505 The Professional School Counselor (3 semester hours)

The Professional School Counselor is an introductory course that sets the stage for future in-depth study in the School Counseling program. This course covers the history of the School Counseling profession and its integration into the total educational program. The roles and functions of professional school counselors presented are in alignment with the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) National Model and the standards established by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). Candidates are required to conduct interviews with practicing school counselors during this course. While observation hours are not required they are strongly encouraged for a full course experience. Candidates are therefore advised to verify that they will have access to a practicing school counselor and preferably also to classroom settings prior to scheduling the course during summer months.

EDUC507 Professional Orientation and Ethical Practice (3 semester hours)

Professional Orientation and Ethical Practice covers the development of professional dispositions and ethical and legal foundations of the counseling profession especially as it relates to practice in the public schools. This course examines critical issues in the practice of the profession of school counseling, providing information relating to ethical standards and codes, legal responsibilities, counselor responsibilities and professional identity, and related professional organizations. Overall, candidates are prepared to provide fundamental school counseling services to diverse populations in an ethical and professional manner. (Prerequisite: EDUC505)

EDUC509 The Professional School Leader-Certification Track (3 semester hours)

This course serves as an introduction to the skills one needs to become an effective school leader. Course activities involve having the potential leader examine the qualities of effective leadership; exploring definitions of leadership and the creation of a personal model for leadership practices. This course provides candidates opportunities to reflect on personal and professional goals while gaining an understanding of the role of building administrator.

EDUC510 Foundations of College Counseling/Student Affairs (3 semester hours)

Foundations of College Counseling/Student Affairs is an introductory course providing a comprehensive overview of the historical and philosophical foundation of student affairs/college counseling. Organizational, management, and leadership theories relevant to college settings, the roles and functions associated with careers in student affairs and college counseling, and contemporary trends and challenges will be examined. Students analyze higher education policies and procedures, programs, and services that meet the needs of students in higher education settings.

EDUC512 Diversity and Communication in Education (3 semester hours)

This course examines issues relating to the skills that promote equal learning opportunities in the classroom, including effective approaches to working with colleagues, staff, parents, and students who are culturally, ethnically and socio- economically diverse. Interpersonal communication skills – to include speaking, listening, reading, and writing - and their effect on individuals, organizations, and communities will be discussed. Topics examined include ethnic, cultural, gender, class, religious, and linguistic diversity, as well as human exceptionality. The use of technology as an aid to effective communication will be presented. Laws and issues that have a bearing on curriculum and instruction for exceptional students will be examined.

EDUC513 Critical Perspectives on Diversity and Culture (3 semester hours)

This course, designed for educators, examines issues related to promoting equitable learning opportunities in the classroom, including effective approaches to encourage collaboration among colleagues, staff, parents, and students who are culturally, ethnically and socio-economically diverse. Interpersonal communication skills – to include speaking, listening, reading, and writing - and their effect on individuals, organizations, and communities will be discussed. Topics examined include ethnic, cultural, gender, class, religious, and linguistic diversity.

EDUC514 Critical Perspectives on Diversity and Culture (3 semester hours)

This course, designed for practicing educators, examines issues related to promoting equal learning opportunities in the classroom, including effective approaches to encouraging collaboration among colleagues, staff, parents, and students who are culturally, ethnically and socio-economically diverse. Interpersonal communication skills – to include speaking, listening, reading, and writing - and their effect on individuals, organizations, and communities will be discussed. Topics examined include ethnic, cultural, gender, class, religious, and linguistic diversity.

EDUC515 Helping Relationships (3 semester hours)

Helping Relationships provides an understanding of the counseling process especially as it relates to practice in school settings. Special attention is given to the counselor qualities and skills that influence helping. Candidates develop fundamental counseling and consultation skills including listening, relationship building, interviewing, and assessment. Discussions also include the effects of social and cultural diversity on the helping relationship. Candidates learn how to incorporate skills into a comprehensive school counseling program that helps facilitate the development of children and adolescents. Professional issues as they relate to ethics, legal considerations and diversity concerns also are examined. Prerequisite: (Prerequisite: EDUC507)

EDUC518 Educational Psychology (3 semester hours)

This course examines the theoretical and applied aspects of learning, motivation, human development, personality, assessment, and evaluation in the educational setting. Content includes the study of learning theories as well as cognitive, emotional, and social learning processes that underlie education and human development to include affective processes and socialization. Emphasis is placed on developing skills to better understand learners to foster improved learning, influence and manage classroom learning, and recognize and consider individual differences.

EDUC520 The Principalship (3 semester hours)

This course examines the role of the principal as an instructional leader and how the principal can manage educational programs, personnel, and facilities while promoting professional development among staff. Candidates will learn how to organize tasks and projects to include the participation of various staff members. System and continuous-improvement processes as they apply to school improvement will be discussed and candidates will evaluate community attitudes, cultures, and appropriate communication strategies. Resources for improving internal and external home-school-community relations will be identified.

EDUC522 Supervision of Instruction (3 semester hours)

This course will study the ways in which teachers and educational professionals incorporate instructional leadership into their organizational behavior and create instructional practices that raise levels of teaching and learning. The course focuses on teachers as leaders, the importance of teacher leadership to improve outcomes in educational settings, and Professional Learning Communities (PLCs). (Prerequisite: EDUC503).

EDUC523 Supervision of Instruction (3 semester hours)

This course will study the evaluation process and candidates will learn how to use aspects of effective teaching strategies when working with teachers during the observation/walk-through process. Strategies for coaching and mentoring teachers for improved student achievement will be presented. Candidates will focus on the process of gathering data for the formal evaluation process and on providing professional development to meet teacher needs. Attention will also be given to analyzing and interpreting assessment results and other instructional data and how to deliver effective professional development to improve teaching and learning.

EDUC525 Classroom Management (3 semester hours)

This course examines classroom- management models, including theoretical and empirical approaches to classroom management. The course helps candidates develop appropriate classroom management skills, including decision-making and problem-solving; explore the merits and limitations of each classroom-management model; and examine the rationale for when each approach to classroom management would be most appropriately implemented. The course also presents concepts of extrinsic and intrinsic motivation; the concept of self-motivation; assertive, positive, and cooperative discipline methods; and examines the interactions of classroom environment, classroom behavior, and learning. Candidates will focus on implementing practical strategies for both preventing and managing disruptive behaviors. Topics include establishing effective classroom rules and procedures, relationships among students, teachers, families, and administrators, and helping students contribute to a positive and relevant learning environment. A field observation classroom experience where candidates apply what they are learning is a requirement of this course.

EDUC526 Secondary Teaching Strategies (3 semester hours)

This course introduces candidates to a variety of pedagogical approaches from the objectivist, constructivist and social family of learning models. Through case study analysis, candidates will critically assess the syntax of instructional models that can be applied across a variety of content areas. Candidates will demonstrate their understanding of various teaching models and integrated model constructs through the development of lesson plans in their content area. As part of this process it is expected that cross-modal approaches to content exploration will be developed, which in turn can be transitioned into classroom application. In addition, candidates will become engaged in critical analysis and evaluation of these lesson plans in order to develop a self-reflective approach to praxis.

EDUC527 Classroom Management for the 21st Century (3 semester hours)

This course is designed for the practicing K-12 education professional and focuses on positive classroom management approaches and strategies. This course reviews models of classroom management as well as the fundamentals of behavior change. Program candidates will explore systematic approaches including Response to Intervention (RTI) and Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) and topics such as cultural considerations, data tools, assessment and analysis of behaviors, and fostering community and collaboration in classrooms. In this course, candidates will focus on implementing strategies for class-wide, small group, and individual intervention as well as methods for monitoring student progress. (Prerequisite: EDUC503.) Equivalent to EDUC524.

EDUC530 Assessment, Evaluation, and Testing I (3 semester hours)

This course examines individual and group approaches to assessment, evaluation, and the basic concepts of standardized and non-standardized educational and psychological testing. Candidates learn the appropriate methods for selection, administration, and interpretation of tests. Research and statistical concepts such as reliability, validity, and standard error of measurement are reviewed. Candidates also become familiar with the most frequently used personality, educational, clinical, intelligence, and special population instruments. Discussions include historical perspectives regarding assessment, testing ethics, and use of instruments with diverse populations. (Prerequisite: EDUC505).

EDUC531 Maximizing Student Achievement Through Effective Assessment (3 semester hours)

Educators learn the appropriate methods for selection, administration, and interpretation of assessments in K12 education, and other instructional settings. Research and statistical concepts such as reliability, validity, and standard error of measurement are reviewed. Educators also become familiar with the most frequently used personality, educational, intelligence, formative, and summative assessments. Discussions include historical perspectives regarding assessment, testing ethics, and use of instruments with diverse populations. (Prerequisite: EDUC503)

EDUC533 Assessment, Evaluation, and Testing II (3 semester hours)

Assessment, Evaluation, and Testing II addresses assessment and intervention plans related to developmental, behavioral, and mental disorders. Candidates will explore mental health diagnosis using DSM-5 criteria, evaluate symptoms and review assessments used in the diagnostic process. Additional topics covered in the course include suicide assessment, addictions, abuse, trauma, eating disorders, and evidence-based treatments. Through case study activities, candidates will conceptualize clients, identify measurable treatment goals and design developmentally and culturally relevant counseling treatment and intervention plans appropriate to the counseling setting. This course also covers evidence-based prevention programs, Response to Intervention, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Section 504, and initiating appropriate referrals. (Prerequisite: EDUC530)

EDUC535 Theories of Counseling (3 semester hours)

Introduces the fundamental counseling theories with special emphasis on how they would be applied in educational settings. Candidates develop an appreciation of the relationship between theories, issues affecting students, and the utilization of key helping strategies. Theories covered range from psychoanalytic, humanistic, existential, behavioral, cognitive, gestalt, and postmodern approaches. Ethical and multicultural considerations are also discussed.(Prerequisite: EDUC507)

EDUC536 Foundations of Coaching (3 semester hours)

Foundations of Coaching is an eight week course designed to introduce the models and basic skills used in executive coaching and/or life coaching practices. This course introduces the vital skills, methods, and strategies required of an effective coach including developing coaching relationships, setting goals and planning, developing awareness, asking powerful questions, communication and language, action and accountability and facilitating learning and results. Participants will examine various coaching models and gain knowledge of the ethical considerations associated with coaching relationships. This training prepares participants to coach individuals, groups, and teams for performance, development, skills and personal/professional growth. Participants will engage in coaching conversations, apply best practices, and practice creating empowering coaching experiences.

EDUC541 Elementary School Mathematics (3 semester hours)

This course explores mathematics in the elementary school setting. The class is approached through the following four sections: 1) preparing students to study higher level mathematical content; 2) math content and pedagogy; 3) connection between elementary math and higher level math content; and 4) best practices for teaching mathematics at the elementary level. Throughout the course, candidates will be asked to make connections between higher level mathematics and how that relates to the depth and complexity of the content. Candidates will then explore those connections through creating practical methods to be used in a class setting. The use of instructional technology and resources as enhancements to understanding and the teaching of math will also be explored.

EDUC542 Elementary School Science (3 semester hours)

The course explores the objectives, methods, and instructional emphasis of elementary school science. It examines research related to elementary school science instruction with emphasis on innovative science programs. It includes an analysis of teaching science to elementary school children with emphasis on current science education trends, science curricular materials, and techniques applicable in the teaching of science in the elementary school. Objectives, philosophy, selection, and organization of science materials and methods are also addressed. Please be aware that candidates in the M.ED Teaching Elementary Education program will need to purchase a classroom science lab pack for EDUC 542: Elementary School Science. The set contains items that can be used in your elementary classrooms and is an investment for you and your future students. The lab materials will be ordered from a company called “LabPaq” will need to be ordered 1 – 3 months prior to the anticipated start of the course, EDUC 542. You can order the lab materials from www.LabPaq.com. The item is # SM-1 and costs $289. You must have purchased and received the LabPaq prior to the start of EDUC 542 in order to successfully complete the course assignments. Therefore, please plan accordingly.

EDUC543 Issues, Methods, and Materials in Teaching Social Studies (3 semester hours)

This course examines the purposes, significant issues, and current trends which affect social science and history subject matter in the elementary and secondary schools. It includes an exploration of the materials and techniques for effective teaching of the social studies with an emphasis on the selection and organization of classroom methods and materials to accelerate the preadolescent and adolescent child’s understanding of their social and global environment; the criteria to select appropriate social studies content, skills, and attitudinal objectives; teaching strategies; the inclusion of instructional technology in the classroom setting; and the evaluation procedures that facilitate the social learning of young children and adolescents. It also addresses the cultural, economic, political, and social development of students living in a multicultural and global environment, as well as the scope and sequencing of history and social studies courses in the school curriculum.

EDUC544 Literature for Elementary School Children (3 semester hours)

This course examines the building blocks of teaching children to read. It focuses on the stages of literacy acquisition. It provides an overview of the core components of literacy instruction, which are phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and text comprehension. The course includes an exploration of instructional strategies to implement a coordinated literature program and plan an appropriate curriculum in literacy development.

EDUC545 Reading and Writing in the Elementary School (3 semester hours)

This course examines the methods and materials for teaching reading and writing in the elementary school classroom. It includes a review of the research and literature pertaining to the basic concepts underlying reading and writing methods; an introduction to emergent literacy in the elementary classroom, the psychological and linguistic factors that influence the reading and writing process; reading comprehension strategies, vocabulary development, phonemic awareness, and the use of technology in teaching reading and writing. The course also explores the relationship between reading and writing; strategies for developing listening and speaking skills; reading materials and methods for students with special needs; expository writing; integrating the language arts across all areas of the elementary school curriculum and the effect of current reading process theory on teaching practices.NOTE: You may NOT take EDUC545 if you have taken EDUC551.

EDUC546 Social Studies Curriculum Development (3 semester hours)

This course examines the development of behavioral objectives, materials, classroom instructional procedures, subject matter, diagnosis and remediation, and evaluation procedures consistent with the 10 national themes for social studies. In this course candidates develop necessary knowledge and skills to design, plan, and implement a secondary level social studies program. This course includes an overview of the social science disciplines and their concepts and generalizations; the methodology of historical study; strategies for teaching which include a variety of media and both teacher-centered and student-centered activities; and a discussion of the diverse settings in which social studies are taught. Current issues and topics in social studies education are also examined.

EDUC547 Elementary School Social Studies (3 semester hours)

This course includes an exploration of the materials and techniques for effective teaching of the social studies, with an emphasis on the selection and organization of classroom methods and materials to accelerate the preadolescent and adolescent child’s understanding of their social and global environment. Topics covered include developing and using criteria to select appropriate social studies content, skills, and attitudinal objectives; teaching strategies; the inclusion of 21st Century tools in the classroom setting; and the evaluation procedures that facilitate the social learning of young children and adolescents. It also addresses the cultural, economic, political, and social development of students living in a multicultural and global environment. Current issues and topics in social studies education are also examined.

EDUC548 Content Area Literacy (3 semester hours)

This course presents essential literacy skills and examines ways in which they may be developed in K-12 subject area classrooms. The course will provide an overview of the reading process based on current theory and scientifically based research as well as best practices for promoting content area reading and learning. A variety of instructional strategies for reading and writing will be presented for use in all content areas and grade levels. The use of technology to expand students’ literacies will also be investigated.

EDUC549 Elementary School Arts Across the Curriculum (3 semester hours)

The course addresses visual and performing arts standards and their integration across core elementary curriculum. The course is designed to introduce elementary teacher candidates to the application of visual and performing arts content across the areas of mathematics, science, language/literature, and history/social sciences, including current events and humane topics. The course focuses on learning about, with, and through the arts.

EDUC550 Elementary School Health and Physical Education (3 semester hours)

Through interconnected activities, this course prepares elementary teacher candidates to address health education topics and physical education and movement to enhance children's learning. The course examines strategies related to developing children's motor skills, fitness, and appreciation of a healthy lifestyle. Topics such as physical growth and maturation, equipment and facilities, classroom management of physical movement activities, psychosocial factors, adaptations for diverse learners, assessment, and health/physical education lesson integration across elementary core curriculum will be addressed.

EDUC551 Inclusive Elementary Reading and Writing (3 semester hours)

This course examines the methods and materials for teaching and assessing reading and writing in the elementary school classroom. It includes a review of the research and literature pertaining to the basic concepts underlying reading and writing methods; an introduction to emergent literacy in the elementary classroom, the psychological and linguistic factors that influence the reading and writing process; reading comprehension strategies, vocabulary development, phonemic awareness, phonics, and the use of technology in teaching reading and writing. The course explores the relationship between reading and writing; strategies for developing listening and speaking skills; materials and methods for students with special needs; integration of the language arts across all areas of the elementary school curriculum; multiple literacies; and the study of literature genres and their relationship to other content areas. Prerequisite: EDUC502NOTE: You may NOT take EDUC551 if you have taken EDUC545 or EDUC552.

EDUC552 Inclusive Literacy Strategies (3 semester hours)

This course examines best practices in literacy instruction. The course exposes candidates to research-based strategies that can be used with a variety of diverse learners at all levels of text acquisition. It focuses on planning appropriate curriculum before, during, and after students are engaged in a text. The course is designed to give candidates a sound understanding of the most important factors affecting student learning today.NOTE: You may NOT take EDUC552 if you have taken EDUC551.

EDUC560 Special Education Topics (3 semester hours)

This course provides pre-service and in-service teachers with an examination of the characteristics of exceptional students to include gifted, developmentally disabled, learning disabled, and emotionally/behaviorally disordered. The course includes identification and implications for planning instruction for these exceptional students as well as exploring legislation, philosophy, least restrictive approaches, parent involvement, and due process safeguards. Federal legislation including Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, IDEA, ADA, and Section 504 are discussed. Finally, major contemporary issues related to field of special education to include legal, curricular, and instructional procedures appropriate for students at the elementary, middle, and secondary school levels are examined.

EDUC561 Issues and Ideas in Special Education (3 semester hours)

This course provides educators with an opportunity to critically examine major contemporary issues related to field of special education to include legal, curricular, and instructional procedures appropriate for students at the elementary, middle, and secondary school levels, or in other instructional settings. (Prerequisite: EDUC503)

EDUC570 Personnel and Human Resource Management (3 semester hours)

This course will focus on the skills necessary for principals to effectively work with faculty and staff. Current theories and practices relating to recruitment, development, and appraisal of personnel will be covered. The course will examine specific personnel functions such as recruitment, selection, retention, and evaluation. Additional topics include conflict resolution, effective communication skills, and creating and maintaining a positive school environment.

EDUC580 School Finance and Facilities (3 semester hours)

This course explores the principles of public school financing and the roles of federal, state and local governments and agencies in financing public education. The content will incorporate forces of economic change, development of new societal and educational infrastructures, and implications for social spending. Techniques and methods of estimating local, state, and federal revenues; alternative methods of school budget planning and control; managing human resources, and cost analysis will be covered. Taxation for school purposes, the economics of education, equity and disparity issues, budgetary concerns, strategic planning, and procedures for school-site management are included. An analysis of federal and state legal issues pertaining to the provision of funds for public education is covered.

EDUC590 Differentiation for Learners in Mixed Ability Classrooms (3 semester hours)

This course is designed to give regular education teachers strategies to use in academically and culturally diverse classrooms. Using case studies as a launching point, course participants will examine the complexities of balancing the needs of gifted education, general education, special education, and culturally diverse students in a standards-driven climate. Use of tiered assignments, alternative assessments targeting different intelligences, and other modifications will be evaluated, implemented, and refined. Course participants will collaborate to address beliefs, best practices, challenges, current research, and ways to apply them to their own teaching practice.

EDUC596 Literacy Instruction for Struggling and Challenging Students (3 semester hours)

This course is designed for the education professional and focuses on positive classroom management approaches and strategies. This course reviews models of classroom management as well as the fundamentals of behavior change. Students will explore the impact of legislation such as No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 (IDEA) with emphasis on systematic approaches including Response to Intervention (RTI) and Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS). In this course, students will focus on implementing strategies for class-wide, small group, and individual intervention as well as methods for monitoring student progress. (Prerequisite: EDUC 503)

EDUC600 Diversity and Cultural Issues in TESOL Education (3 semester hours)

This course provides an in depth discussion of the concept of culture and helps educators and other instructional personnel recognize the influence of culture on learning, communication, belief systems and value orientations, and patterns of thinking and behaving. Opportunities for instructional application, including creating an appropriate learning environment and/or curriculum and materials for culturally diverse students, will be provided.

EDUC601 Methods and Materials in TESOL Education (3 semester hours)

This course is intended for both regular education and English Language Learners teachers and will focus on developing instructional strategies for supporting ELL students in content area learning. Course participants will develop instructional and leadership skills needed for teaching ELL. Participants will reflect upon using proven assessment and instructional practices to enhance learning in today’s challenging classroom environments. Cases will be used to facilitate online discussions regarding beliefs, best practices, challenges, current research, and applications to individuals’ own teaching practice.

EDUC603 Applied Linguistics in TESOL Education (3 semester hours)

Through this course, participants will become knowledgeable about the nature and structure of language and how first and second languages develop. Participants will explore language teaching strategies consistent with the current understanding of the nature, structure and development of language. By developing a repertoire of effective strategies, participants will become more proficient at supporting students’ second language development. Educators will investigate best practices and current research and consider how to adapt and integrate these principles into their own educational practice.

EDUC605 Foundations of Education for the Academically and Intellectually Gifted (3 semester hours)

This core course provides a basic understanding of the characteristics and needs of gifted and talented children. Emphasis is placed upon current issues in the study of gifted and talented students and the programs designed to meet their needs.

EDUC607 Assessment of Academically and Intellectually Gifted Learners (3 semester hours)

Course participants will develop instructional strategies and leadership skills needed to support the identification and teaching of gifted students. Examination of assessment options, gifted services, and student creativity will help inform instructional practices suitable for today’s challenging classroom environment. Case studies will serve as a launching point and teachers will be given the opportunity to collaborate and explore beliefs, best practices, challenges, current research, and ways to apply these to their own teaching practice.

EDUC611 Identifying and Diagnosing Reading Difficulties (3 semester hours)

This course is designed for general education classroom teachers and focuses on classroom reading assessment. Participants will learn how to administer formal and informal measures of reading assessment, including screening, diagnostic, and progress monitoring measures. The assessment to instruction link will be emphasized during each session. Educators will use a variety of assessment tools and practices to plan and evaluate effective reading instruction.

EDUC612 Issues and Models of Language Arts Education (3 semester hours)

This course is designed to assist educators in the teaching of reading and language arts. The focus will be on reading, writing, listening, and speaking. The emphasis will be on creating environments conducive to developing all students’ skills in the four language arts using research-based instructional strategies. The course also focuses on differentiating instruction for students of varying literacy levels.

EDUC613 Teaching Reading and Writing across the Content Areas (3 semester hours)

This course concentrates on interdisciplinary teaching and learning in elementary, middle, and high schools. Witnessing and discussing a range of cross-curricular activities, participants will develop an understanding of the benefits, challenges, and essential components of effective integrated instruction.

EDUC614 Living and Learning with Exceptional Students (3 semester hours)

Course participants will develop instructional and leadership skills required for teaching students with special learning needs, as well as students at-risk for academic and social failure. The concepts of educator collaboration, least restrictive environment, accommodations and modifications, confidentiality, behavior management, identification, and giftedness will be reviewed using authentic case studies. Participants will reflect upon how these concepts drive instructional practices in today’s challenging classroom environment. Case studies will be used to facilitate online discussions regarding beliefs, best practices, challenges, current research, and applications to individuals’ own teaching practice. The cases in this course depict problems and opportunities related to classroom management, individual behavior management strategies and systems, functional behavioral assessments, developmentally appropriate behavior management goals, and zero tolerance policies. (Prerequisite: EDUC503)

EDUC615 Understanding and Diagnosing the Needs of the Special Learner (3 semester hours)

Course participants will develop instructional and leadership skills needed for teaching students with special learning needs, as well as students at-risk for academic and social failure. The concepts of teacher collaboration, least restrictive environment, accommodations and modifications, confidentiality, behavior management, identification, and giftedness will be reviewed using authentic case studies. Participants will reflect upon how these concepts drive instructional practices in today’s challenging classroom environment. Using the cases as a launching point, teachers will be given the opportunity to participate in on-line discussions regarding beliefs, best practices, challenges, and current research.

EDUC616 Foundations in Special Education and the Individuals with Disabilities Education (3 semester hours)

This course addresses legal trends and issues related to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), including the identification process that schools must follow: child study, assessment, eligibility, IEP development, and placement. Educators will analyze the legal requirements as defined in IDEA, specifically, the requirements for Free and Appropriate Education (FAPE), the Least Restrictive Environment (LRE), and the development of Individualized Education Plans (IEPs). Cases will be used to facilitate online discussions regarding beliefs, best practices, challenges, current research, and applications to individuals’ own teaching practice.

EDUC618 Classroom Accommodations and Modifications for Special Needs Learners (3 semester hours)

This course explores accommodations and modifications for special learners within the Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) and enhances regular and special educators’ understanding of how best to address the individual needs of special learners. Cases and readings focus on the creation of appropriate accommodations, the integration of accommodations into a general education classroom, the legal requirement for accommodations, and the roles of the general and special education educators within the LRE. Course participants will contribute to online discussions regarding beliefs, best practices, challenges, current research, and ways these affect their own teaching practice.

EDUC619 Student Development in Higher Education (3 semester hours)

Student Development in Higher Education is a course focused on the principles and key concepts of working with "traditional" and "non-traditional" students in college settings. This course will examine the developmental processes that impact college students, student development theories, and development of effective programs to meet various learning, personal, career, and identity development needs.Prerequisite: EDUC510.

EDUC621 Online Learning for the Adult and the K-16 Learner (3 semester hours)

This course will examine the differences between the learning needs and abilities of the adult and the younger learner. The course will highlight the importance of differentiating instruction and course development between adult learners and K-12 learners. The adult learner may be viewed as a student who is a mature worker and approaching the achievement of a degree after they are more self-guided in their learning. The adult learner seeks learning to make sense and will rarely perform an activity that is not related or aligned. These adult learning attributes differ from the younger learner, who may need guidance in how to be self-directed and apply new information toward an important purpose and future direction. (Candidates in the M. Ed. Teaching-Concentration in Secondary Social Studies program must take the 16-week course version per the West Virginia Board of Education-no exceptions.)

EDUC622 Ethics and Legal Issues in Online Learning (3 semester hours)

This course will focus on the issue of ownership of certain types of intellectual property on the internet, which has become a critical issue with emerging Web 2.0 technologies becoming so prevalent in our schools and culture. In this course online, face-to-face, and hybrid educators, or candidates, will learn about the different types of potential copyright infringement and its implication for course development. There will be an attempt to dispel the common notion that since material is readily available on the internet, it is now public domain and is free from copyright concerns. (Candidates in the M. Ed. Teaching-Concentration in Secondary Social Studies program must take the 16-week course version per the West Virginia Board of Education-no exceptions.)

EDUC623 Online Learning and Student Achievement (3 semester hours)

In this course candidates will develop an understanding of the structure of the different types of software/genres (e. g. application, drill and practice, tutorial and simulation), and their effect on raising student achievement. Candidates will gain an appreciation for the types of online learning experiences that will enhance the online student experience. Scholarly literature that addresses student achievement gains via technology will be examined. Candidates will be introduced to a typology for software and interactive web experiences that predict the effect of student achievement based on the unique features of interactive product. (Candidates in the M. Ed. Teaching-Concentration in Secondary Social Studies program must take the 16-week course version per the West Virginia Board of Education-no exceptions.)

EDUC624 Assessment of Online Learning (3 semester hours)

In this course students will examine various approaches to the assessment of online learning. The assessment will be focused toward a specific singular online offering in that students will learn to evaluate whether the online course achieved its goals and that effective instruction has actually occurred. Comprehensive models of assessment such as Stufflebeam’s CIPP model will be applied to the evaluation of an entire program. This model will look at all aspects of instruction, such as frequent evaluation of textbooks and curriculum frameworks. (Candidates in the M. Ed. Teaching-Concentration in Secondary Social Studies program must take the 16-week course version per the West Virginia Board of Education-no exceptions.)

EDUC625 Instructional Design in Online Learning (3 semester hours)

In this course candidates will explore and evaluate the different types of online learning platforms, as well as study the different components of asynchronous and synchronous instructional delivery. Candidates will demonstrate an ability to develop a complete online course for delivery in the Blackboard, Sakai, eCollege, Moodle, or other LMS environment. (Candidates in the M. Ed. Teaching-Concentration in Secondary Social Studies program must take the 16-week course version per the West Virginia Board of Education-no exceptions.)

EDUC626 Web 2.0 Technology Integration (3 semester hours)

This course will examine the different technology applications that have emerged as a result of the development of Web 2.0. Candidates, or course participants, will learn about the potential for using social networking sites as vehicles for effective communication that can promote as well as inform. Candidates will be introduced to the new world of writing applications for Apple proprietary products such as iPhone and iPad and other smart phones and tablet devices. In addition candidates will be exposed to cloud computing and GoogleDocs and WebQuest applications for blended learning in traditional K-16 content curricula and delivery. (Candidates in the M. Ed. Teaching-Concentration in Secondary Social Studies program must take the 16-week course version per the West Virginia Board of Education-no exceptions.)

EDUC627 Group Counseling - Theory and Practice (3 semester hours)

Explores the theories and techniques associated with group counseling especially as they apply to school settings. The role of group counseling is discussed in relation to the effectiveness of the overall comprehensive counseling program. Candidates discuss the types, stages, and methods of organizing and facilitating groups. Consideration of issues involved in group work with persons from different cultural, religious, racial, and ethnic backgrounds is included. Ten hours of participation in a growth group is required during the eight week course. Students experience group counseling from a participant’s perspective and reflect on group counseling skills. (Prerequisite: EDUC515 and EDUC535).

EDUC628 Social and Cultural Diversity Counseling (3 semester hours)

Examines the influence of cultural and ethnic differences and the delivery of counseling services. Candidates explore a variety of topics including culture, ethnicity, race, nationality, age, gender, sexual orientation, mental and physical characteristics, education, values, and socioeconomic status. Candidates discuss how cultural variables affect the counseling relationship. Topics include theories, strategies for effective multicultural counseling, ethical delivery of services, and culturally responsive assessments. This course is designed to develop self-awareness, knowledge, and skills in working with diverse populations. (Prerequisite: EDUC515)

EDUC629 Personalized and Individualized Online Learning (3 semester hours)

This advanced graduate course will examine the current best practices for personalization for each individual student in our K-16 classrooms. Personalization is closely related to two additionally important terms: individualization and differentiation. All three terms require a shift from a teacher-centered approach to an authentic student-centered approach. A true student-centered focus requires tailoring of lessons to the abilities, interests, preferences, future life dreams, socio-emotional attributes, and other needs of individual students. The course examines motivation, assessment, and technological tools and how they pertain to personalization in online, face-to-face and hybrid contexts. (Candidates in the M. Ed. Teaching-Concentration in Secondary Social Studies program must take the 16-week course version per the West Virginia Board of Education-no exceptions.)

EDUC630 Introduction to Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) (3 semester hours)

This course provides candidates with an examination of characteristics of students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) across the lifespan. Defining characteristics as outlined in the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association and multidisciplinary peer-reviewed research are examined. Prevalence rates, etiology, and co-morbid conditions are studied relative to historical progression. Ethical implications and obligations related to ASD evaluation, eligibility determination, and implications for educational programming are analyzed with attention to legislative rights and protections under the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA), Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504).(Prerequisite: EDUC503)

EDUC631 Evidence-Based Practice for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) (3 semester hours)

This course provides candidates with examination of the components of and process for evidence-based practice (EBP) in educational programming for students with ASD to include integration of research-validated intervention strategies with other critical factors (i.e., professional judgment and data-based decision making, family values and preferences, and capacity). Intervention strategies with the highest level of empirical support will be examined with attention to qualifying evidence, effective proven outcomes, and ages of individuals. Medication commonly prescribed to students with ASD will be explored related to target behavior and potential side effects. Laws, legislation, and litigation related to EBP for students with ASD will be examined.(Prerequisite: EDUC630)

EDUC632 Educational Programming for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) (3 semester hours)

COMING IN 2016. This course provides candidates with examination of the components of and process for ASD program development and progress monitoring to include the leadership role. Assessment instruments and procedures specific to the development of effective programs for students with ASD will be studied to include Functional Behavior Assessment and subsequent Behavior Intervention Plans. The process for defining and detailing target skill and behavior goals will be examined in relation to the development of Individualized Education Program and Section 504 Plans. Strategies for facilitating inclusion in the general education classroom will be explored. Laws, legislation, and litigation related to educational programming for students with ASD will be analyzed. (Prerequisite: EDUC631)

EDUC633 Emotional Intelligence and Coaching Assessments (3 semester hours)

Building on the foundational coaching skills gained in EDUC533, Emotional Intelligence and Coaching Assessments provides participants with an understanding of emotional intelligence and when and how to use assessments in the coaching experience. Participants learn about Emotional Intelligence (EI) and its role in coaching. Participants examine several coaching assessments to gain familiarity and an understanding of when each assessment is appropriate for coaching. Specifically, participants will consider tools such as the Wheel of Life, Personality Type, DISC, EI, TPI, Strengths, and other assessments designed for diverse settings. Participants will also examine the ethical considerations associated with using assessments in the coaching relationship. Prerequisite: EDUC536.

EDUC635 Coaching Groups and Teams (3 semester hours)

Coaching Groups and Teams extends participants’ thinking about coaching from coaching individuals to coaching groups and teams. Participants compare strategies for team and group coaching alongside those for coaching individuals. This course offers participants an opportunity to examine coaching groups and teams within an organizational system. As with the other trainings in this series, participants will explore and expand the application of coaching competencies and focus on ethical considerations associated with coaching groups and teams vs. coaching individuals. Prerequisite: EDUC633.

EDUC636 Effective Instruction for the Inclusive Classroom (3 semester hours)

This course examines the particular role of the classroom educator in understanding a systematic approach to planning curriculum and instruction for academically diverse learners. This approach to effective instruction will focus on the classroom factors relating to the nature of the student and the essential meaning of the curriculum. Particular emphasis will be placed on classroom elements that the educator can differentiate – or modify – to increase the likelihood that each student will learn as much as possible, as efficiently as possible. This would include the areas of content, process, products, affect and learning environment. Additionally, there are three core student characteristics that educator must consider when creating curriculum and instruction: readiness, interest, and learning profile. The idea of differentiating instruction to accommodate the different ways that students learn involves a hefty dose of common sense, as well as sturdy support in the theory and research of education.

EDUC637 Meaningful Inclusive Instruction and Co-Teaching (3 semester hours)

This course examines the role of the educator working collaboratively with other school and instructional personnel in an inclusion model. This approach to effective instruction will focus on the classroom factors relating to the nature of the student and the essential meaning of the curriculum. Particular emphasis will be placed on classroom elements that educators can differentiate – or modify – to increase the likelihood that each student will learn as much as possible, as efficiently as possible. This would include the areas of content, process, products, affect and learning environment. The idea of differentiating instruction to accommodate the different ways that students learn often involves working with others to reach this goal. (Prerequisite: EDUC503)

EDUC640 Research Methods in Education (3 semester hours)

This course provides an overview of approaches to research; rationales for methodological choices; uses and abuses of research processes and findings; tools and techniques for finding or generating data; tools and techniques for analyzing data; decision-making and interpretation; making conclusions public; and ensuring that research participants are respected and valued throughout the process. Thorough coverage of these topics is designed to equip practitioners with the knowledge and skills necessary to select, evaluate, and apply findings from extant research related to issues at the individual, classroom, school, or district levels. Additionally, the course is designed to prepare practitioners to conduct high quality action research projects aimed at the individual, classroom, school, or district levels, or additional educational environments. Candidates in the M. Ed. Teaching-Concentration in Secondary Social Studies program must take the 16-week course version per the West Virginia Board of Education-no exceptions.(Prerequisite Courses: EDUC502, EDUC503, EDUC505, EDUC506, EDUC508, OR EDUC509).

EDUC641 Research Methods in Education (3 semester hours)

This course provides an overview of approaches to research; rationales for methodological choices; uses and abuses of research processes and findings; tools and techniques for finding or generating data; tools and techniques for analyzing data; decision-making and interpretation; making conclusions public; and ensuring that research participants are respected and valued throughout the process. Thorough coverage of these topics is designed to equip practitioners with the knowledge and skills necessary to select, evaluate, and apply findings from research related to issues at the individual, classroom, school, or district levels.

EDUC645 Career Counseling and Development (3 semester hours)

Career Counseling and Development explores career development theories and the career decision making process. Special emphasis is placed on strategies used by school counselors to assist children, adolescents, and teens in making career and educational decisions. Candidates learn how to encourage motivation by connecting personal values and interests with academics. Topics include multicultural considerations, the relationship between careers and other life roles, and assessment instruments relevant to career planning. The process of career development will be covered as well as the implications for students with disabilities.(Prerequisites: EDUC507)

EDUC650 21st Century Teaching and Learning (3 semester hours)

Coming in 2016. This course explores how technology may be used as a tool in the 21st Century classroom to facilitate changes in the ways teachers teach and students learn, and ultimately to stimulate positive changes in education. It also examines how educators can increase their own productivity by using technology for communication and collaboration among colleagues, staff, parents, students, and the larger community. Candidates will examine the benefits and possible drawbacks of technology use in their classrooms and learn how to integrate technology effectively into their teaching as a means to promote student learning. Candidates will discover how technology can be an engaging and effective tool in the classroom. Candidates will also have the opportunity to learn how to incorporate the latest technology and software into the curriculum to support learning. This course addresses the standards developed by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE). It also incorporates 21st Century Learning Skills. The importance of ICT (information and communication technologies) literacy is emphasized.

EDUC651 Technology Leadership in Education (3 semester hours)

The course is designed to help school administrators develop an understanding of how to create and support technological change through a systems approach. Topics include sources of resistance to change, tools for planning, decision-making and change, creating and supporting a culture for learning and change, and managing and institutionalizing change systems. Administrators will evaluate the essential 21st century skills for success in today’s world, such as critical thinking, problem solving, communication, creativity and collaboration, as well as skills and strategies for leading their school or district into the ongoing process of technology integration.

EDUC652 Powerful Technology Applications for the Active Learning Environments (3 semester hours)

This course explores how technology may be used as a tool to facilitate changes in the ways teachers teach and students learn, and ultimately to examine how teachers can use technology more efficiently and effectively to improve student achievement. The course also examines how educators can increase their productivity by using technology for communication and collaboration among colleagues, staff, parents, students, and the larger community. This course addresses the National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers (NETS•T), developed by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE). (Prerequisite: EDUC503)

EDUC655 Counseling Children, Adolescents, and Teens (3 semester hours)

This course expands on the Counseling Theories (EDUC535) course by providing a further evaluation of the theories, techniques, and strategies especially helpful when working with school age populations and their families in the context of a comprehensive school counseling program. The course explores counseling issues and provides specific techniques and strategies that are developmentally appropriate and applicable to the school setting. Activities focus on the delivery system of the ASCA National Model including the school counseling core curriculum, individual student planning, responsive services, consultation, and collaboration. Application of ethical standards and legal requirements unique to counseling children and adolescents is included. (Prerequisite: EDUC515 and EDUC535)

EDUC664 Emerging Issues and Trends in Education Leadership (3 semester hours)

This course examines a framework to address the emerging issues and trends in educational leadership that have the potential to significantly influence the future direction of education. It describes how the educational leader can address emerging issues and trends, build the necessary leadership competence to respond to these issues and trends, and develop into a more accountable leader who can deal effectively with the need for school reform.

EDUC665 Emerging Issues and Trends in Education Leadership (3 semester hours)

This course examines a framework to address the emerging issues and trends in administration and supervision that have the potential to significantly influence the future direction of education. It describes how the educational leader can address emerging issues and trends, build the necessary leadership competence to respond to these issues and trends, and develop into a more accountable leader who can deal effectively with the need for school reform. Time will be spent studying the effects of media on student learning, taking into account that the K-12 and adult students of the 21st Century are “digital learners” whose learning styles are likely to be quite different from those of K-12 teachers and adult instructors. Research, study, discussion, and writing assignments will enable candidates in this course to systematically analyze various issues and trends such as accountability, privatization, national standards, voucher plans, organizational change, the diverse educational community, community resources and partnerships, marketing strategies and process, and other topics. (Prerequisite: EDUC503)

EDUC669 Education, Law, Ethics, and Politics (3 semester hours)

This course explores legal, ethical and politics issues governing K-12 education in America and the legal responsibilities and powers of state and local governing bodies and individuals that arise in elementary and secondary schools. This course focuses on understanding federal codes, case law, policies, and significant precedent and will emphasize analysis of key legal concepts and application of law to specific situations. The ethics of decision making and the process through which school leaders can advocate for political reform will be examined. Major areas of analysis include personnel, risk management, curriculum, student services, parent and student rights, teacher rights and torts.

EDUC670 Education Law, Ethics, and Politics (3 semester hours)

This course explores legal, ethical, and political issues governing K-16 education in America and the legal responsibilities, powers of state, and local governing bodies that arise in elementary and secondary schools. Topics include confidentiality, testing, liability for student injury, due process, search and seizure, staff appraisal, employment discrimination, church/state conflicts, control over the curriculum, the expression of controversial views, issues related to the financing and adequacy of state school finance plans, and the schools' authority to make rules governing student and teacher conduct. Issues surrounding in-school and in-district politics will also be discussed. Contracts, dismissals, tenure, retirement, liability of personnel and district, school district boundary changes, and bonding are also explored. Emphasis is given to federal and state statutes and case law affecting due process, liability, equal protection, and the rights of teachers and students in order to better understand the risks in education management and possible strategies to reduce those risks. (Prerequisite: EDUC503)

EDUC671 Integrated Elementary Mathematics and Sciences (3 semester hours)

This course is intended to allow the educator to examine the objectives, methods, instructional emphasis, and integration of elementary school mathematics and science. Educators are given the opportunity to examine research related to elementary school mathematics and science instruction with an emphasis on innovative programs. The course also includes an analysis of teaching mathematics and science to elementary school children with emphasis on current educational trends, curricular materials, and techniques. The use of instructional technology and resources as an enhancement to understanding the teaching of math and science will also be explored.

EDUC672 Integrated Elementary Language Arts and Social Studies (3 semester hours)

This course explores the keys to successful integration of language arts into the elementary social studies curriculum. It will enhance understanding and appreciation of social studies content and processes and language arts skills that promote progress toward social education goals. Social studies is integrative by nature (National Council for the Social Studies, 2009). Powerful and purposeful social studies incorporates language arts skills to help young learners use context clues to suggest meaning, decipher maps and charts, and interpret primary and secondary source documents. Knowing innovative ways to integrate language arts into the social studies curriculum is extremely important. A high quality integrative social studies and language arts curriculum brings forth carefully chosen Big Ideas and Essential Understandings with authentic action to promote social understanding and civic efficacy. This course will delineate the integrative nature of elementary social studies and explore the ways in which literature adds depth and breadth. (Prerequisite: EDUC503)

EDUC680 Principal Internship (3 semester hours)

This is an experiential course where candidates intern as school principals in K-12 schools under the direct supervision of qualified professionals. The intern candidate will work in either an elementary or secondary school setting to develop professional skills related to supervision and demonstrate mastery of the essential skills required by school principals. Interns are placed under the supervision and coaching of an APUS faculty member and an onsite certified school principal. The candidate will be required to document a minimum of 150 hours of supervised experience in a school setting.

EDUC690 Student Teaching (9 semester hours)

This course, the required semester of student teaching, provides the teacher candidate classroom experiences under the direction of a fully licensed teacher. At least half of the classroom time must be spent in supervised direct teaching activities in the concentration area sought. Candidates are expected to participate in school opening sessions if the student teaching is conducted in the fall semester; or school closing activities if the student teaching is conducted during the winter semester. In addition, candidates are expected to fully participate in the life of the school community. EDUC 690 will only be offered during the months when classes are in regular session in order to ensure that candidates have an authentic experience. Candidates must coordinate start dates with the Coordinator of Field Experience. The candidate teacher is placed in the clinical for a minimum of 12 weeks. Throughout the course, candidate teachers are required to keep logs and journals of their experiences and to review the teaching/learning process with their supervisors.

EDUC691 Internship I (3 semester hours)

This course is Part I of the current internship and requires completion of 300 hours of direct on-site experience in either an elementary and/or secondary school setting (K-12) to develop professional skills related to counseling and demonstrate mastery of the essential skills required by school counselors as identified by CACREP standards. This experience will provide an opportunity for candidates to apply knowledge and skills while working under the supervision of an approved, experienced, and certified/licensed school counselor. Candidates are required to meet weekly with their university supervisor for group supervision and engage in weekly individual/triadic supervision. Candidates are placed in settings which align with career goals and interests and provide services in alignment with the ASCA National Model including individual counseling, group counseling, consultation, collaboration, advocacy, and other activities typical in that setting. This course is offered when school is in active session in order to ensure that candidates have an authentic experience. A Readiness Audit is required prior to admission to this course. The audit requires documentation of an acceptable placement for the internship, including supervision; documentation of completed Practicum hours; and verification of successful completion of the Practicum course or eligibility for successful completion of the Practicum. The Readiness Audit must be completed no later than 30 days prior to the Internship start. NOTE: Internship courses are not offered in the following months: April, May, June, and July. Internship courses are NOT included in the university retake policy. All grades for any attempts will appear on transcript and will be calculated in GPA. NO LATE REGISTRATIONS ALLOWED. Candidates must enroll in both Internship I and Internship II in order to meet graduate requirements. (Prerequisite: All courses in program including EDUC696).

EDUC692 Internship II (3 semester hours)

This course is Part II of the current internship and requires completion of the remaining 300 hours of direct on-site experience (for a total of 600 hours when totally hours from Internship I and Internship II) in either an elementary and/or secondary school setting (K-12) to develop professional skills related to counseling and demonstrate mastery of the essential skills required by school counselors as identified by CACREP standards. This experience will provide an opportunity for candidates to apply knowledge and skills while working under the supervision of an approved, experienced, and certified/licensed school counselor. Candidates are required to meet weekly with their university supervisor for group supervision and engage in weekly individual/triadic supervision. Candidates are placed in settings which align with career goals and interests and provide services in alignment with the ASCA National Model including individual counseling, group counseling, consultation, collaboration, advocacy, and other activities typical in that setting. This course is offered when school is in active session in order to ensure that candidates have an authentic experience. A Readiness Audit is required prior to admission to this course. The audit requires documentation of an acceptable placement for the internship, including supervision; documentation of completed Practicum hours; and verification of successful completion of the Practicum course or eligibility for successful completion of the Practicum. The Readiness Audit must be completed no later than 30 days prior to the Internship start. NOTE: Internship courses are not offered in the following months: April, May, June, and July. Internship courses are NOT included in the university retake policy. All grades for any attempts will appear on transcript and will be calculated in GPA. NO LATE REGISTRATIONS ALLOWED. Candidates must enroll in both Internship I and Internship II in order to meet graduate requirements. (Prerequisite: All courses in program and EDUC691 and EDUC696).

EDUC693 Supervised Student Teaching (6 semester hours)

This course, the required semester of student teaching, provides the teacher candidate classroom experiences under the direction of a fully licensed teacher. At least half of the classroom time must be spent in supervised direct teaching activities in the concentration area sought. Candidates are expected to participate in school opening sessions if the student teaching is conducted in the fall semester; or school closing activities if the student teaching is conducted during the winter semester. In addition, candidates are expected to fully participate in the life of the school community. This course will only be offered during the months when K-12 classes are in regular session in order to ensure that candidates have an authentic experience. Candidates must coordinate start dates with the Coordinator of Field Experience in the School of Education. The candidate teacher is placed in the clinical experience for a minimum of 12 weeks and must complete both university course work and clinical field work during the term. Throughout the course, candidate teachers are required to keep logs and journals of their experiences and review the teaching/learning process with their supervisors. Prequisite: Must be taken after ALL other program requirements are fulfilled and have a GPA of 3.0 or above.

EDUC695 Capstone Seminar K-12 Learning Organization (3 semester hours)

Since the early days of K-12 education in the United States public schools have been the primary option for the education of K-12 students. With trends toward non-traditional K-12 learning organizations becoming more popular, students are gaining access to a variety of non-traditional learning models. This course will focus on the unique structures of non-traditional K-12 learning organizations, including the various types of charter schools, private schools, and a look at online learning for the K-12 student. (Prerequisite: EDUC509 and 30 of 36 program hours completed).

EDUC696 Practicum (6 semester hours)

This 16-week course will offer the candidate an opportunity to observe and experience 100 hours of counseling activities in the school setting under direct supervision of an experienced school counselor. Candidates are required to complete specialized assignments that enhance their understanding of the role of the counselor in the school environment. Candidates observe and engage in activities with experienced school counselors which may include classroom guidance, group counseling, and individual counseling in addition to other school counseling related activities. Candidates are required to participate in synchronous group supervision sessions and complete weekly journals that document their on-site experiences and theoretical knowledge. Discussions include ethics, working with diverse populations, and practical issues in delivering a comprehensive school counseling program. All coursework must be completed prior to registration. Pre-Service candidates are required to contact the Coordinator of Field Experience when they have finished 50% of their program coursework prior to the Practicum course in order to discuss the Readiness Audit process. Upon receipt of candidate notification of 50% program completion, the School of Education will provide the candidate with a formal application for the Practicum (EDUC696) and Internship (EDUC699) courses. Careful attention needs to be paid to submission deadlines which require that all Readiness Audit documentation be submitted no later than 30 days prior to the Practicum start. NOTE: If you intend to complete your Practicum and Internship consecutively, without break, it is strongly recommended to begin the Practicum experience during August, September, or October to facilitate a smooth transition into the school setting during the regular academic school year. Practicum courses are not offered in the following months: April, May, June, and July. NO LATE REGISTRATIONS ALLOWED.

EDUC697 Clinical Supervision (3 semester hours)

Clinical supervision is a professional candidate teaching experience that is a result oriented, performance based experience requiring the demonstration of a satisfactory level of teaching performance. The clinical requires demonstration of teaching competencies in a school setting under the direction of cooperating teachers and university supervisors. The clinical experience provides the candidate teacher with the opportunity to learn, in depth, the full role and meaning of teaching in a supervised school setting. Experiences include planning and organizing for instruction, developing classroom teaching competencies and skills, evaluating student progress, participating in extra-curricular activities, working with special school personnel, and utilizing 21st Century Learning Resources in the instructional program. The candidate teacher is placed in the clinical for a minimum of 12 weeks. Throughout the course, candidate teachers are required to keep logs and journals of their experiences and to review the teaching/learning process with their supervisors.

EDUC698 Capstone: Action Research (3 semester hours)

Accomplished teachers have a rich understanding of the subject(s) they teach and associated content area pedagogical practices. In this course, candidates will assess their teaching practice in the context of previous coursework, observational experiences, and teaching. They will apply content area knowledge to contemporary theory through the development of artifacts and reflective pieces related to praxis. Candidates will also engage in discourse related to emerging social and philosophical issues in teaching to prepare them to be informed practitioners. This course will focus on action research in a classroom situation. Its purpose is to inform candidates with respect to ongoing pedagogical practices. All grades for any capstone attempts will appear on transcript and will be calculated in GPA.

EDUC699 Internship (6 semester hours)

During this 600-hour internship course, the counselor candidate will work in either an elementary and/or secondary school setting (K-12) to develop professional skills related to counseling and demonstrate mastery of the essential skills required by school counselors as identified by CACREP standards. This experience will provide an opportunity for candidates to apply knowledge and skills while working under the supervision of an approved, experienced, and certified/licensed school counselor. Candidates are also required to meet weekly with their university supervisor for group supervision and engage in weekly individual/triadic supervision. Candidates are placed in settings which align with career goals and interests and provide services in alignment with the ASCA National Model including individual counseling, group counseling, consultation, collaboration, advocacy, and other activities typical in that setting. This course is offered when school is in active session in order to ensure that candidates have an authentic experience. A Readiness Audit is required prior to admission to this course. The audit requires documentation of an acceptable placement for the internship, including supervision; documentation of completed Practicum hours; and verification of successful completion of the Practicum course or eligibility for successful completion of the Practicum. The Readiness Audit must be completed no later than 30 days prior to the Internship start. NOTE: Internship courses are not offered in the following months: April, May, June, and July. Internship courses are NOT included in the university retake policy. All grades for any attempts will appear on transcript and will be calculated in GPA. NO LATE REGISTRATIONS ALLOWED. (Prerequisite: EDUC696)