PHYS133 Elements of Physics I with Lab (4 semester hours)

This fundamental Physics course is the first of two courses that examine basic Physics using algebraic techniques. Topics include Mechanics, Fluids, Oscillations, Waves, Temperature, Heat, and thermodynamics. The course involves study through hands-on laboratory experiments designed to help reinforce and build upon the concepts presented in the lectures. NOTE: In addition to the laboratory equipment provided as part of the course materials, students will need access to the following: paper towels, water, a freezer, a stove top, a pot, a pencil and crushed ice. (Prerequisites: MATH110, MATH111, or MATH225)

PHYS134 Elements of Physics II with Lab (4 semester hours)

This fundamental physics course is the second of two courses that examine basic physics using algebraic techniques. The course covers electric forces and fields, electric currents and circuits, magnetic forces and fields, electromagnetic induction, alternating current, electromagnetic waves, reflection and refraction of light, optical instruments, interference and diffraction, and an introduction to quantum and particle physics. NOTE: In addition to the laboratory equipment provided as part of the course materials, students will need access to the following: pencils, a printer, several sheets of paper and water. NOTE: This course requires the student to purchase additional materials that are not covered by the book grant. Please refer to the Course Materials section for additional details. (Prerequisite: PHYS133)

PHYS180 Introduction to Physics (3 semester hours)

This course offers an introduction to classical physics for non-scientists. Students will learn to apply Newtonian principles to the fundamental topics of motion, gravitation, momentum, work and energy, heat, wave behavior, sound and light, electricity and magnetism. Basic algebra is used to demonstrate how mathematics can describe and predict the real-world behavior of objects, from electrons to planets. Students will be expected to relate physics principles to their daily lives. Students will discuss the process of the scientific method and also demonstrate science information literacy skills through source selection and creation of a narrated presentation.