MILH201 Introduction to Military History (3 semester hours)

This course is a survey of the changing patterns of warfare within Western civilization, to include analyses of principal military thinkers and the evolving relationship among Western societies, warfare, and their military institutions.

MILH202 Survey of American Military History (3 semester hours)

This course is a study of the American military institution from the colonial period to the current environment in the 21st century. Students will examine military traditions and employment of forces during war and peace as well as the relationships between the military and society. Recommended prerequisites are two lower level survey courses in U.S. or World History.

MILH221 War From Antiquity to 1700 (3 semester hours)

This course is a survey and discussion of warfighting during ancient times through to the beginning of the 17th century with emphasis on technological advances in the military arts and sciences and their short term and long term effects on strategy and tactics.

MILH222 War from 1700 to the Present (3 semester hours)

This course is a survey and discussion of warfighting from end of the 17th century until now, to include military arts and science as well as combined arms employment. Emphasizes the innovations and changes in strategy, tactics, organization and technology engendered by the decisions of the great captains of each age.

MILH303 Readings in Military Leadership (3 semester hours)

This course is a study of military leadership of ancient to present day commanders through selected readings. Emphasis will be on the burden of command and the various solutions that military leaders employed in the prosecution of war. Ancient and modern leadership will be examined, but the primary focus will be on the modern era. (Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

MILH304 Readings in Military Philosophy (3 semester hours)

This course is a study of basic concepts in military strategy and tactics viewed through the prism of the selected readings from well-known military philosophers. Both ancient and modern philosophers will be studied. (Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

MILH320 The American Revolution (3 semester hours)

This course examines the American Revolution from its antecedents to its legacy. The events leading to the revolt and the Declaration of Independence; the strategy and tactics of the war emphasizing the land campaigns; and the aftermath of war on the new Nation. (Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

MILH355 World War I (3 semester hours)

This course analyzes World War I, from the political unrest in Europe in 1914 and the outbreak of war to the Armistice in November 1918 to the treaty of Versailles in 1919 and the official end of the war. Global in scope, the themes highlight the origins of the conflict, Entente and Central Powers strategies, plus the major military campaigns, power diplomacy, life on the home front and America’s entry and effect to the Entente (Allied) war effort her entry had on the outcome of the conflict. (Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

MILH360 World War II (3 semester hours)

This course is a global examination of the Second World War with an emphasis on the origins of the conflict, Axis and Allied strategies, major military campaigns, great power diplomacy, life on the home front, and the Holocaust. The experience of combat, social and political changes that resulted from the conflict and the scientific consequences of the war will be continual themes addressed by the course material.(Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

MILH362 Ancient Military History (3 semester hours)

This course is a comprehensive survey of ancient and classical warfare (prehistory to c. AD 500) in Western Civilization from the origins of warfare in the Paleolithic period to the decline and fall of the Western Roman Empire in the fifth century. The millennia under study in this course were a dynamic period in warfare, full of important discoveries and innovations in martial technologies, strategy, organization and combined-arms tactics, fortification, siege craft, and naval warfare. Students will read and analyze a wide variety of sources on ancient and classical warfare in Mesopotamia and the Near East (Sumerian, Akkadian, Babylonian, Hittite, Assyrian and Persian), Egypt (Old, Middle and New Kingdom), Greece (Mycenaean, Archaic, Hellenic and Hellenistic) and Rome (Republican and Imperial) in order to develop an appreciation of the important contributions of these civilizations to the continuity of warfighting in the Western world. (Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

MILH363 17th and 18th Century Military History (3 semester hours)

This course covers the history of warfare from the Spanish Armada in 1588 to the dawn of the French Revolutionary wars in the 1790s. The 17th and 18th centuries were an era in world history abound in continuous warfare. The militaries of Europe in particular were still primarily composed of mercenaries, politically and often militarily unreliable. Warfare in this era was not confined to the plains of Europe; the world’s oceans also played host to their own form of combat. The 17th and 18th centuries at sea began with Great Britain on the verge of invasion from the Spanish Armada to Great Britain becoming the unquestioned master of the ocean. Thus, the 17th and 18th centuries began in an aura of indecisiveness and closed awash in the destruction of “world” war. The evolution of warfare from the inconclusive to the decisive battle is explored in depth.(Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

MILH364 Medieval Military History (3 semester hours)

This course is a comprehensive study of European post-classical warfare from the decline and fall of the Western Roman Empire in the fifth century to the integration of reliable gunpowder technologies at the beginning of the sixteenth century (c. 450 to c.1500 AD). Students will read and analyze a wide variety of sources on medieval warfare in order to develop an appreciation of the important contributions of the European Middle Ages to the continuity of warfighting in Western civilization. Contrary to popular belief, the millennium under study in this course was a dynamic period in warfare, full of important rediscoveries and innovations in fortification, siegecraft and combined-arms technology, organization and tactics, all of which allowed Europe to become the preeminent military power in the period after 1500 AD.(Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

MILH365 The Napoleonic Wars and the Long Peace (3 semester hours)

This course examines the theory and practice of warfare in Europe from 1785 to 1870. It will emphasize the rise of Napoleon as a military leader, as a practitioner of the operational art, but will also examine his political, economic and legal impact on Europe as a whole. This course will focus on the wars of the French Revolution, Napoleon's northern Italian campaigns, his expedition to Egypt, his battles while leading the Grand Army at Austerlitz and Jena, and his march to Moscow where he led the largest army in European history to date. It will also cover the 1813 and 1814 campaigns, the reactions of Napoleon's enemies to his innovations in warfare, and his final defeat at Waterloo. The course then looks at the status of Europe in 1815 and the conditions which set the terms for the “Long Peace”. The course ends prior to the start of the wars of 1870 and the lessons learned.(Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

MILH370 The Korean War (3 semester hours)

This course provides a history of the Korean War from pre-hostilities to post-ceasefire. The course mainly concentrates on the U.S. and South Korean conflict against North Korean and Chinese forces, but other UN participants are covered throughout the course. All three levels of conflict, from tactical to strategic are discussed. The increase in technology, the usage of modern weapons, POWs, and the continued presence of U.S. forces in the Republic of South Korea are also covered. (Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

MILH371 The Vietnam War (3 semester hours)

This course examines the origins of the conflict in Indochina, American intervention and commitment, the ground wars, Vietnamization, trouble at home, the US withdrawal, and the war's effect on American society.(Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

MILH411 Diplomacy and War I (3 semester hours)

This course is a comprehensive international study of the struggles between and among states, beginning with ancient times and ending with the Congress of Vienna, and of the relationship between diplomacy and war in pursuing national objectives. (Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

MILH412 Diplomacy and War II (3 semester hours)

This course is a comprehensive international study of the struggles between and among states, beginning with the restructuring of Europe after the Congress of Vienna and ending with the fall of the Berlin Wall, and of the relationship between diplomacy and war in pursuing national objectives. (Prerequisite - HIST300 for History and Military History majors only).

MILH422 History of Peacekeeping: 1988-Present (3 semester hours)

This course examines the strategy, operations, evolution, and functions of United Nations and regional peacekeeping operations (PKO) from the end of the Cold War to the present. Emphasis is on the significance of individual peacekeeping missions, including their background, functioning, military operations, and end result. While the United Nations peacekeeping operations are studied in detail, other forms of peacekeeping are presented as well.

MILH460 World War II (3 semester hours)

This course is a global examination of the Second World War with an emphasis on the origins of the conflict, Axis and Allied strategies, major military campaigns, great power diplomacy, life on the home front, and the Holocaust. The experience of combat, social and political changes that resulted from the conflict and the scientific consequences of the war will be continual themes addressed by the course material.(Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

MILH480 Special Topic: Military History (3 semester hours)

This course is a one-time offering on an area of special interest and may be applied to fulfill major course requirements or electives. A student may appeal to take this course twice, if the subject matter is different enough to merit separate credit.WINTER 2016 SPECIAL TOPIC - MEDAL OF HONORStudents will learn about the story behind the Medal of Honor and the significance of the design of the Medal. Students will also learn how Confederates were honored with a Roll of Honor. They will learn that the Medal of Honor Legion was founded in 1890 to protect the Medal from abuse. They will learn that 911 Medals of Honor were revoked in 1917 after all the Medals to date were reviewed, including those of the only woman and the 27th Maine, and will learn if any of these Medals were restored later. They will also learn about modern Medal of Honor recipients.

MILH490 Independent Study: History (3 semester hours)

An opportunity for Military History students to pursue an independent research project or examine a specific area of history under the mentorship of a single professor. Course is open to Military History majors only. The course will typically involve a major research paper; there will be no examination. Students will submit a proposal prior to the start of the project, and a rough draft of the paper, both of which will count toward the final grade. To be eligible for an independent study, students must be enrolled in a bachelors degree program, must have completed 24 hours at APUS toward their current degree program, and should have already contacted a professor and gained approval for the independent study topic. Once these conditions are met the student should contact his/her academic advisor. Once the course is open the student must complete an official online registration for the course. (Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

MILH498 Senior Seminar in Military History (3 semester hours)

The Senior Seminar in Military History is designed to integrate the student's past work in their major field of study and to review as well as strengthen their understanding of their focus area in military history. After a review of the student’s academic experience, the student and professor will design a course of study to complete the student’s preparation for research and writing a major paper in their field of interest. This is a capstone course to be taken after all other Military History courses have been satisfactorily completed. Student must have SENIOR standing to register. (Prerequisite: HIST491)