IRLS200 Information Literacy and Global Citizenship (3 semester hours)

Information Literacy and Global Citizenship builds students’ information literacy skills in the international relations/global studies context. Students analyze scholarly sources in the discipline, identifying the types of issues and questions scholars pursue, the discursive conventions they employ, and their methods of engaging in dialogue with and citing sources. After identifying their own discipline specific research question, students select and use appropriate research tools, developing complex search strategies that help them to find relevant scholarly information on their topics. They evaluate sources and information to determine their authority, reliability, timeliness as well as the quality and underlying assumptions of the arguments presented. They synthesize the information they’ve found with their own ideas, effectively integrating source material into their papers and citing that material appropriately. Finally, the course asks students to reflect upon the ways in which the information literacy skills they’ve acquired provide a foundation for both global citizenship and lifelong learning. NOTE: Students may not earn credit for both IRLS200 and previous course IRLS303.

IRLS210 International Relations I (3 semester hours)

An overview of the field of international and global politics. The nation state, factors of power, collective security, international trade, regional and international organization, sources of conflict and convergence are addressed.

IRLS211 International Relations II (3 semester hours)

This course analyzes international relations from 1945 to the present. Students will become thoroughly familiar with events and major interpretive issues. Topics include the Cold War, decolonization, the role of the United Nations and other non-governmental organizations, the development of international terrorism, the Arab-Israeli and Persian Gulf conflicts, and the Korean and Vietnam Wars. (Prerequisite: IRLS210).

IRLS213 Political Geography (3 semester hours)

September 11 and its aftermath, the ongoing conflicts in the Middle East and South Asia and debate over the nature and effects of globalization all highlight the importance of political geography as a means of understanding the world around us. This course examines the relationship between earth and state. World political phenomena are studied from a geographic perspective, including international boundaries, territorial seas, and landlocked states. This course emphasizes the practical application of geography to political events.

IRLS214 American Foreign Policy (3 semester hours)

This class examines the elements and practice of American Foreign Policy.  It reviews the history of American Foreign Policy and ideology, and then examines the actors, tools and processes of US foreign policy.  This class emphasizes current foreign policy issues, including policy geared toward national security.

IRLS260 Middle Eastern Culture (3 semester hours)

This course covers geography, culture, society, economy, and religions of the major ethnic and linguistic groups in the Middle East. The course will introduce students to important events and developments, such as the changing concepts of politics in Islam; the evolving sociological bases of states and societies in the Middle East; and the early impact of Europe on the Middle East, first through trade and then through colonialism.

IRLS300 Comparative Political Systems (3 semester hours)

Introduces major theoretical approaches to the comparative study of politics. The student applies these approaches to government institutions, the policy-making process, political participation, economic structures and social change for both state and non-state actors.

IRLS301 International Organizations (3 semester hours)

Examines the role of and interrelationship of international organizations, nation-states, and non-state actors in the global system. North-South and East-West relations are discussed in terms of specific global issues: crisis management, conflict resolution, human rights, refugee problems, international finance, developmental assistance, world trade, and globalization.

IRLS302 International Development (3 semester hours)

A detailed study of the history, theories, and practices of global development initiatives with particular concentration in the prevailing views and practices of the 1960’s-contemporary times. A look at development in light of broader political constructs that influence the development of nations.

IRLS310 Introduction to Human Security (3 semester hours)

This course introduces students to the international relations subfield of human security. A broad overview of the security issues affecting humans, their communities, and as a result global stability are the focus of this course.

IRLS322 African Politics (3 semester hours)

This class provides an introduction to contemporary African politics. Specifically the course examines the historical, cultural, economic, social and geographic traits that distinguish this region and shape its domestic political processes and interstate relations. This includes a survey of contemporary multilateral issues important to the region with emphasis on regional security concerns.

IRLS331 Asian Politics (3 semester hours)

This course examines historical, cultural, economic, social and geographic traits that distinguish this region and shape its domestic political processes and interstate relations. This course surveys the governments of selected countries to include China, Japan and Korea. Topics will emphasize the interaction between economic development and political changes, as well as the conflict between traditional norms and modern institutions. This course includes a survey of contemporary multilateral issues important to the region with emphasis on regional security concerns.

IRLS343 Government and Security of Russia (3 semester hours)

Explores historic, cultural, economic, and geographic traits that characterize the Russian state and shape the domestic political processes and interstate relations. Critically compares the politics, governments and orientations of post-Soviet states and other regional powers. Surveys contemporary regional issues such as ethnic conflict, nationalism and political-economic reforms, with a particular emphasis on security concerns.

IRLS344 European Politics (3 semester hours)

This course focuses on comparative evaluation of Europe paying particular attention to challenges facing the continent such as migration, ethno-nationalism, and terrorism. It will also focus on opportunities for European countries to work together, including NATO, OSCE, and the EU.

IRLS355 Latin American Politics (3 semester hours)

This course is designed to familiarize students with the politics of contemporary Latin America. The course will cover such topics as the various types of political systems found in Latin America, the political economy of development, and the issue of regime transition.

IRLS360 Global Politics of Islam (3 semester hours)

The purpose of this course is to provide a comprehensive survey of the politics of Islam in the global context (both within and across states). While a portion of the class will be dedicated to the Middle East, we will also focus on parts of the globe where Muslims form a significant minority, e.g., the U.S., Western Europe, Russia, and China. This is an interdisciplinary class, meaning that we will discuss religion, history, culture, and identity in addition to politics. We will explore the implications of past and present U.S. foreign policy in the Muslim world and historical and current relations between Islam and the “West.” Additionally, we will address conflicts within Islam, transnational Islamist movements such as Hizb-ut Tahrir and Al Qaeda, and the role of pan-Arab media such as Al Jazeera. This is a reading-intensive course. Students will be expected to think critically, interpret texts, and formulate their own ideas in verbal and written form.

IRLS392 Globalization and the Market Economy (3 semester hours)

Based on a theoretical analysis, a detailed study is undertaken of the globalization of the market system and its impact on population growth, urbanization, political governance, and traditional values in various nation-states and regions.

IRLS400 Human Rights (3 semester hours)

This course provides an overview of human rights, their history, codification, and the various debates that surround human rights discourse. Additionally various human rights topics are analyzed. The course provides students with a thorough understanding of how human rights and human security are intertwined.

IRLS402 International Law and Regimes (3 semester hours)

This course focuses on the role that international law and international regimes play in global governance. Students will examine the international legal framework that governs state relations, including international organizations and norms, ordering principles, treaties and international regimes.

IRLS405 National and Transnational Justice (3 semester hours)

This course provides an overview of many transitional and transnational justice approaches. Beginning with Nuremberg through to the International Criminal Courts, students will gain a thorough understanding of the global justice endeavors and their connection to human security.

IRLS409 Environmental Security (3 semester hours)

This course provides an overview of environmental security by examining environmental threats such as climate change, water scarcity, consumption patterns, urbanization, resource extraction and usage, food security, and globalization. The course provides students with a thorough understanding of how environmental security and human security are intertwined.

IRLS412 Comparative Foreign Policy (3 semester hours)

An analysis of the foreign policy and policy-making process in various regions of the world. Specific case studies allow the student to assess national priorities and ideological commitments in the post-Cold War era.

IRLS413 International Conflict Resolution (3 semester hours)

This course examines the application of conflict resolution theories to interstate crises and civil wars by international organizations like the UN and NATO, states and ad hoc coalitions of states and non-government entities. The focus will be on the post-cold war conflicts.

IRLS414 Principles of Peacekeeping (3 semester hours)

This course explores logistics in peacekeeping operations. Students will gain an understanding of the concepts, principles, and strategies that govern logistical support for UN and regional peace operations. Emphasis is placed on building an understanding of the role, responsibilities, and limitations facing those who manage logistics for peace operations. This includes challenges surrounding funding and rapid deployment, as well as the advantages and challenges associated with public/private partnerships and a multi-dimensional approach to peacekeeping logistics.

IRLS415 Peacekeeping Logistics (3 semester hours)

This course explores logistics in peacekeeping operations. Students will gain an understanding of the concepts, principles, and strategies that govern logistical support for UN and regional peace operations. Emphasis is placed on building an understanding of the role, responsibilities, and limitations facing those who manage logistics for peace operations. This includes challenges surrounding funding and rapid deployment, as well as the advantages and challenges associated with public/private partnerships and a multi-dimensional approach to peacekeeping logistics.

IRLS416 The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) (3 semester hours)

This course will explain how an alliance of nations, formed to protect its member countries from a re-emergence of post-World War II Germany, transformed itself in order to protect Western Europe from the Warsaw Pact. It will delve into how an alliance that was purely defensive in origin evolved into an organization that conducted offensive operations in Bosnia-Herzegovina and attacked a sovereign nation in an attempt to bring peace to Kosovo. It will conclude with a study on the possible future of NATO in the changing environment of Europe and America. The scope of this course focuses on the role of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) since it’s founding to the present. The course includes the formation of the Alliance, the study of the member countries military forces, the organization and purposes of the various NATO Headquarters, the role of NATO in the Cold War, and the role NATO is playing today in the stabilization of Europe.

IRLS417 International Civil Order (3 semester hours)

This course explores the unique role of international civilian police in peacekeeping operations. Students will gain an understanding of the principles, strategies, operational and tactical considerations that shape the way that international civilian police establish a rule of law that is effective enough to support emerging democratic societies and build sustainable peace. Emphasis is placed on the roles, responsibilities, challenges, and risks facing international civilian police, as well as their relationships with other international actors. This course offers a unique advantage, in that completion of this course will make students eligible to obtain a certificate of completion from the United Nation's Peace Operations Training Institute. It is up to the student to go to the POTI website to find how to obtain the POTI certificate, once this course is completed.

IRLS440 The Third World: Dependency and Development (3 semester hours)

This course examines the Third World by focusing on its origins, the colonial legacy that shaped it, the political and social forces that control it, the economic and social programs implemented for its development, while dependency and modernization theories will be studied and assessed through specific case studies. The forces of democratization will be identified and evaluated in relation to development. The power of religion, the plague of ethnic conflict, the human rights abuses (women’s position, child labor, child prostitution), AIDS, the Green Revolution, urbanization, sustainable development arguments and strategies will be evaluated along with their effects on local societies. The course will also identify the various types of revolutionary movements, governments, and the economic models that have been tried after independence. Finally it will evaluate the ties of globalization and review the debate over its effects on the Third World development.

IRLS460 Government & Security in the Middle East (3 semester hours)

Examines historic, cultural, economic, social, religious, and geographic traits that distinguish this region and shape its domestic political processes and interstate relations. Surveys the governments of selected countries, considering factors such as legitimacy and political development. Includes a survey of contemporary issues salient in the region, including the Arab-Israeli dispute, with particular focus on regional security concerns.

IRLS463 Arab-Israeli Conflict: Contemp. Politics & Dipl. (3 semester hours)

This course will trace the origins, evolution and development of the Arab-Israeli conflict from the early 20th century to the present. The course follows a thematic and chronological schema, drawing on a variety of sources. Considerable focus and attention will be given to the current and ongoing conflict between Israelis and Palestinians.

IRLS468 Politics and Security in the Persian Gulf (3 semester hours)

Politics and Security in the Persian Gulf course explores political, social, economic, and cultural issues that are relevant to the contemporary Gulf politics and security. In this context, this course also examines the impact of external powers within the region; and thus, the correlation of this impact with the rise of vulnerabilities and implications both at the regional and global levels.

IRLS490 Independent Study: International Relations (3 semester hours)

Individual study or research of a selected topic conducted on a tutorial basis. To be eligible for an independent study, students must be enrolled in a bachelors degree program, must have completed 24 hours at APUS toward their current degree program, and should have already contacted a professor and gained approval for the independent study topic. Once these conditions are met the student should contact his/her academic advisor. Once the course is open the student must complete an official online registration for the course.(Prerequisite: IRLS210).

IRLS491 Special Topics in International Relations (3 semester hours)

This course allows the students to examine an emergent issue or event in this field of study. The course will be taught in a structured seminar format. Students are required to complete a research project.

IRLS492 Senior Seminar in International Relations (3 semester hours)

This senior capstone course allows students majoring in International Relations to analyze specific issues at the global level that would include: armaments, disarmament and proliferation; nationalism and world order; terrorism; peacekeeping; drug wars; political development and revolutionary change in less developed countries; and the organized use of force. This course will provide students with the opportunity to complete an approved academic research exercise that demonstrates knowledge of a selected field of study. This is a capstone course to be taken after all other International Relations courses have been satisfactorily completed.Prerequisite: Completion of a minimum of 106 hours towards your program.

IRLS493 Capstone Middle Eastern Studies (3 semester hours)

This senior capstone course allows students majoring in Middle Eastern Studies to analyze specific issues at the regional level including the role of religion, culture, politics, security, economic issues. This course will provide students with the opportunity to complete an approved academic research exercise that demonstrates knowledge of a selected field of study. This is a capstone course to be taken after all other Middle Eastern Studies courses have been satisfactorily completed.Prerequisite: Completion of a minimum of 106 hours towards your program.