HIST101 American History to 1877 (3 semester hours)

This course is a survey of United States history from the earliest European settlements in North America through the end of Reconstruction and emphasizes our nation's political, economic, and social development, the evolution of its institutions, and the causes and consequences of its principal wars.

HIST102 American History since 1877 (3 semester hours)

This course is a survey of history of the United States from the end of Reconstruction to modern times. Emphasis will be placed on internal expansion, inherent isolationism, America’s road to becoming a world power, and the development of the concept of America as the "policeman" of the world.

HIST111 World Civilization before 1650 (3 semester hours)

This course is a survey of the history of the human community from the dawn of civilization to 1650. Emphasis is placed on the origins and achievements of the core civilizations of Asia, Europe, Africa and the Western Hemisphere. It stresses the interrelations of societies and cultures of the past, comparing and contrasting the experiences of peoples and civilizations with one another.

HIST112 World Civilization since 1650 (3 semester hours)

This course is a survey course in the history of the human community from 1650 to the present. It covers the origins, development and achievements of the major civilizations and stresses the interrelations of societies and cultures of the past, comparing the experience of peoples and civilizations with one another.

HIST121 Western Civilization before The Thirty Years War (3 semester hours)

This course is a survey of the history and culture of the Western Civilization from the ancient civilizations of the Near East, through the rise of the classical civilizations of Greece and Rome, to the beginnings of Europe's Early Modern period. Emphasis is placed on the examination of the major political, social, economic and religious developments of European history.

HIST122 Western Civilization since The Thirty Years War (3 semester hours)

This course is a study of the history and culture of the Western world, from the beginnings of Europe's Early Modern Period to the present. It covers the major political, social, economic, religious and cultural developments, since the thirty years war.

HIST213 History of Women in the United States (3 semester hours)

This course has been designed as an introduction to the history of women in the United States from the colonial period to the present. It will be surveying the field of American women's history in order to understand how specific political, social and economic transformations in the nation's past have affected the female half of the population. Throughout, it will remain attuned to ethnic and racial diversity and to regional differences and class distinctions in the lives of U.S. women. It will look at women's culture, as distinct from the dominant male culture, and analyze women's writings, art, life cycles and sexuality. It will work to understand the collective lives of women as workers, family members, reformers, and political activists as well as the individual experiences of women in the U.S. from the colonial era into the 21st Century.

HIST221 African-American History before 1877 (3 semester hours)

This course examines the complex and varied experiences of African Americans from slavery to 1877. Topics include West African roots, the middle passage, American slavery and resistance, the development of racism, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. The course will examine internal and external factors that shaped the black historical experience economically, culturally, and politically. While the class is designed to proceed chronologically, important themes such as the development of racism, abolitionist thought, the slave community, and the impact of free blacks will be emphasized.

HIST222 African-American History since 1877 (3 semester hours)

This course surveys the economic, cultural, and political facets of the African American experience from 1877 to the present. Topics of African American history will be examined, such as Jim Crow laws, the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights Movement, and Black Power. While the class is designed to proceed chronologically, themes such as military and diplomatic policies, migration and urbanization, black political thought, and popular culture will be emphasized.

HIST223 History of the American Indian (3 semester hours)

This course surveys American Indian history from before Columbus to the present. It emphasizes the American Indians’ political, economic, and social development, the emergence of the principles that guided them into the 21st century, the evolution of its institutions, and the causes and consequences of its principal wars.

HIST225 West Virginia Studies (3 semester hours)

In this course, students will review the geographical, cultural, economic, and political aspects of the state with an emphasis on the events leading up to statehood and beyond. Local traditions and state sectional patterns are stressed and examined in the context of assimilation into the national body politic.

HIST230 History of East Asia (3 semester hours)

This survey course traces China’s social, political, and cultural developments from the dynastic period to the present. Through this process, this course will examine the Chinese dynastic system, the rise of Confucianism, the adoption of Buddhism, technological developments, and explores the great diversity and impressive continuities of traditional Asian civilization. Additionally, students will explore the historical transformations that have led to the development of modern Asia as well as how China has historically impacted all of Asia. No prerequisite.

HIST270 History of Science (3 semester hours)

Science is unquestionably central in shaping our modern world. Though often directed by the “big science” efforts of universities, global corporations, and nations, it is the individual scientist that populates these scientific communities. It is at this individual level, both professionally and personally, that science touches us most directly. Students earn advanced degrees in a wide range of specialties like physics, biology, and chemistry. Science is also a central component in related fields of medicine, geology, genetics, ecology, cosmology, and technology. On the personal level we encounter science everyday when we eat genetically enhanced food, take complicated medicines to combat illness, debate the origins of life, strive to understand new information about ourselves in the universe, use advanced technologies, and in many more ways. These scientific developments do not emerge instantaneously from a vacuum. To fully understand science, one must have an appreciation of its history and how it has developed over time. The latest scientific advance is merely a snapshot of the present, and only looking at this image obscures our appreciation of the dynamic interaction between science and culture, and the ways that national, institutional, and individual goals have determined its trajectory. This broader perspective, gained only by the study of the history of science, serves as our central mission in this class.

HIST290 History of the Holocaust (3 semester hours)

This course is an overview of the major historical, political, cultural, religious, and military issues associated with the Holocaust. It will examine how the anti-Semitic propaganda of the early Nazi Party manifested itself into a legitimate political platform, evolving into state sponsored legal legislation, and culminating into an industrialized killing industry. Students will be introduced to the principle historical figures, events and time lines regarding the birth of the Nazi Party, their taking control of the German nation, and finally their political and military actions against those deemed ‘subhuman’. In addition, students will also become well-versed in The Hague and Geneva Conventions regarding the roles of the military and the protective status and qualifications of noncombatants.(Prerequisite: HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

HIST300 Research Methods in History (3 semester hours)

The purpose of this course is to prepare the student for upper-division course work, research, and writing based on historical methodologies such as quantification or paleography. It is designed to familiarize the student with what historians do and how they do it, and affords the student the opportunity to develop their own skills as a historian by interpreting and evaluating primary and secondary source material and presenting their findings in a written, properly referenced format.

HIST301 Ancient Greece (3 semester hours)

This course covers the history of the Greek speaking peoples from the origins of Greek civilization during the Bronze Age to the dispersion of Greek culture during the Hellenistic era through the conquests of Alexander the Great. The topics emphasize the political, social, cultural, and economic institutions and values that Hellas created to revolutionize Ancient Mediterranean history. Students gain an introduction to the history of Greek civilization and a deeper understanding of the nature of democracy, and the relationships among politics, art, literature, and the ideals of civic virtue. (Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

HIST302 Ancient Rome (3 semester hours)

This course will study the history of Ancient Roman civilization from the founding of the Republic in 735 BC to the fall of the western empire in 476 AD. Roman political, military and cultural events and personalities will be the focus of this course. Interaction and conflict with neighboring Mediterranean, western tribal, sophisticated eastern, and later barbarian cultures will serve as the thematic core. The course will also examine the lasting impression and influence of Ancient Roman civilization on European and Western culture.(Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

HIST303 The Middle Ages (3 semester hours)

This course will cover the history of Europe from the 4th/5th century when the Roman Empire was ending to the middle of the 14th century when the new nations were fully defined. Starting with the fall of the Romans and the effect of that fall on Europe, the course will cover the arrival of the “barbarian” invaders, the reign of Charlemagne, the rise of separate, new European states such as France, England and Germany as well as the Church, the relations between these states and with the Byzantine Empire, the period of the Crusades, and the development of different government systems in the various European nations.(Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

HIST304 The Renaissance (3 semester hours)

This course is a survey of Western Europe from 1350 to 1600. It examines the political, military and social events surrounding the re-birth of classical knowledge and artistic expression in Italy known as the Renaissance. The course also traces the movement of the Renaissance northward, focusing on the coming Reformation era. The last part of the course studies the Protestant and Catholic Reformations to include how the Reformations effected the growth of the modern nation-state. (Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

HIST305 France in the Age of Enlightenment (3 semester hours)

This course examines the "Age of the Enlightenment" in France with the reigns of King Louis XV and Louis XVI. Through readings of the functioning of the monarchy, on the world of everyday peoples in Paris and the countryside, and the intellectual climate of the era, students will be able to reconstruct the time known as "the ancient regime." The class will also analyze readings by authors such as Diderot, Voltaire, DuChâtelet, and Rousseau to gain a sense of the intellectual excitement of the "Enlightenment."(Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

HIST306 The British Empire (3 semester hours)

This course examines the British Empire from the late 18th century to the 1960s. It includes the settler colonies, the colonies inhabited almost exclusively by non-European peoples, and the "informal empire" of trade and investment as well as the impact of the Empire upon the British Isles. (Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

HIST307 The Age of Dictators: Europe 1914-1945 (3 semester hours)

This course focuses on the great crises of 20th century European civilization, from the outbreak of war in August 1914 to the defeat of Hitler Germany in May 1945. Through novels and historical monographs, it explores the effects of total war and mass mobilization on the industrially advanced state systems of the period, as well as the social emancipation, economic disintegration, and cultural innovation brought on by the great wars of the period. Particular attention is paid to the experience of the "great powers" (Germany, the Soviet Union, Britain and France), which is supplemented by student research on the smaller countries of Europe. (Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

HIST308 History of European Colonialism (3 semester hours)

This course explores European colonial history from the fifteenth century to the present. It takes into account the exploration, colonization, and decolonization of the Americas, Africa, Asia, India and the Middle East by three major European powers: Britain, France, and Spain. The actions of these countries, among others in Europe, affected the areas they colonized and the indigenous populations for generations to come. This course will focus on the expansion of European empires, the consolidation, management, and disintegration of the empires.Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only.

HIST310 History of Modern Europe (3 semester hours)

The course evaluates European politics from the French Revolution to the industrialization process and effects in the late 18th and 19th centuries. Students assess the impact of military modernization and analyze the commercialization of the culture. An overview of politics and wars in the 20th century and their relationship to the fall and rise of the economy will be presented as well as the concept of European security. The forces of modernization, causes of war, and power of unification will be evaluated, with an emphasis on effects and divisions of the Cold War and democratization wave of the 1990’s. It will examine the evolution of trade unions to a regional union with its effects on politics, economics and security, including case studies of regional terrorism. (Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

HIST320 History of Russia (3 semester hours)

The course covers the history of Russia and its people from the medieval period up to the present. While student projects can be on any aspect of Russian history from any period, the emphasis in the classroom will be on political and social history from the period of reforms in the mid 19th century up to the fall of the Soviet Union. (Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

HIST340 History of Africa (3 semester hours)

This course examines the history of Africa from the first periods in recorded history, through the colonial period and 20th Century. The focus is upon the major European powers that influenced the continent and the internal social, religious, political and economic dynamics specific to each region. (Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

HIST350 History of the Middle East (3 semester hours)

This course examines Middle Eastern history from the era of Suleyman the Magnificent, the 16th-century Ottoman sultan, to the late 20th century. It traces the roots of current Middle Eastern politics to social changes-- as the region lost its pivotal role in the world economy in the 19th century but gained oil wealth-- and to the political aftershocks of colonial occupation a century ago. Themes include the emergence off dictatorship and violence in politics during the 20th century, and especially the conflicts centered on the emergence of Israel; the rise of new political ideologies, nationalism, liberalism, and Islamism; the rise of women’s rights movements, and the reasons that political conflict has come to center on women’s status; and the polarization of rich and poor classes that continues to destabilize domestic politics. (Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

HIST360 History of Latin America (3 semester hours)

This course is a survey course of Latin American History. The subject is approached from two very different perspectives. The primary method is a comprehensive overview of Latin American history and theories important to the study of Latin America and the second provides the student with an overview of the history of individual Latin American countries. (Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

HIST370 Asia and the Modern World (3 semester hours)

This course is a study of major national and international developments within East, Southeast, and South Asia, to include current key issues involving China, Japan, the two Koreas, Indonesia, Thailand, Pakistan, and India. This course focuses on issues in Asia that are important to the national security of the United States, particularly military, political, and economic issues. The course will also provide a close examination of U.S. relations with Asian nations. (Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

HIST402 Colonial America (3 semester hours)

This course explores North American history from the dawn of the British colonization of North America tothe end of the French and Indian War in 1763, which sparked subsequent British Colonial Policy and thus set into motion the events leading to American Revolution in 1775. (Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

HIST403 The Early Republic, 1783-1815 (3 semester hours)

The Early Republic, 1783-1815 examines the development of American political, social, and cultural institutions during the formative years of the new Republic. Through a study of the primary and secondary literature of American history this course surveys the individuals and groups who influenced the American experience, as well as the cultural, political, and socio-economic movements that shaped the nation. (Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

HIST404 Jacksonian America, 1815-1846 (3 semester hours)

Jacksonian America, 1815-1846 examines the nature of Jacksonian democracy and its treatment in American historiography. Through a study of the primary and secondary literature of American history this course surveys the individuals and groups who influenced the American experience, as well as the cultural, political, and socio-economic movements that shaped the nation. (Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

HIST405 Antebellum America, 1846-1861 (3 semester hours)

Antebellum America, 1846-1861 examines the divisive political, social, and economic forces which intensified in the 1840s and culminated in the Civil War. Through a study of the primary and secondary literature of American history this course surveys the individuals and groups who influenced the American experience, as well as the cultural, political, and socio-economic movements that shaped the nation.(Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

HIST406 Civil War And Reconstruction, 1861-1877 (3 semester hours)

Civil War and Reconstruction, 1861-1877 examines the wartime problems of the Union and Confederacy, as well as the consequences of the war and the postwar efforts to create a new Union. Through a study of the primary and secondary literature of American history this course surveys the individuals and groups who influenced the American experience, as well as the cultural, military, political, and socio-economic movements that shaped the nation. (Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

HIST407 The Gilded Age, 1877-1900 (3 semester hours)

The Gilded Age, 1877-1900 examines the rise of the United States as an industrial and world power with particular stress on the changing patterns within American society. Through a study of the primary and secondary literature of American history this course surveys the individuals and groups who influenced the American experience, as well as the cultural, political, and socio-economic movements that shaped the nation. (Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

HIST408 The United States: 1900 to Second World War (3 semester hours)

This course examines the changes in American society at the end of the 19th century as it confronted the issues of industrialization, immigration, and urbanization. It explores the open conflict between the advocates of isolationism and collective security and examines the impact of World War I. It also examines the changing values of the 1920’s, the stock market crash of 1929, the Great Depression that followed, and the prelude to the second world war.(Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

HIST409 The United States: WW II to the Present (3 semester hours)

The United States: WW II to the Present is a study of the political, economic, social, and cultural development of the United States from World War II to the Present. Topics include social and cultural changes in the 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s, 90s, and the first decade of the 21st Century; the United States foreign policy from the post-WWII "Cold War," to Korea, Vietnam, and other global confrontations between the United States and the communist world from Somalia, Grenada, and the First Gulf War to the most recent "War on Terrorism"; and the technological changes and their impact on the social and economical development of the United States.(Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

HIST415 The Cold War (3 semester hours)

The Cold War developed between capitalist and communist nations—primarily between the United States and Russia—shortly after World War II and lasted until the early 1990s. Although the conflict is technically considered over, its impact is still felt in society, politics and economics even today. The Cold War often threatened to transform into a hot war, and actually did so periodically, such as in the Korean and Vietnam Wars. This course focuses on the development of the ideological conflict and its effects on politics, economics, technology, society and culture in both the East and the West. Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only.

HIST480 Special Topic: History (3 semester hours)

This is a special topics course that is designed to afford students the opportunity to examine topics not covered by the existing curriculum. Students are permitted to substitute up to two special topics classes for other courses required in their concentration. Special topic courses are offered quarterly, and the topics for these will vary.

HIST481 Special Topic: History Fall (3 semester hours)

This is a special topics course that is designed to afford students the opportunity to examine topics not covered by the existing curriculum. Students are permitted to substitute up to two special topics classes for other courses required in their concentration. Special topic courses are offered quarterly, and the topics for these will vary.

HIST482 Special Topic: History Winter (3 semester hours)

This is a special topics course that is designed to afford students the opportunity to examine topics not covered by the existing curriculum. Students are permitted to substitute up to two special topics classes for other courses required in their concentration. Special topic courses are offered quarterly, and the topics for these will vary.

HIST483 Special Topic: History Spring (3 semester hours)

This is a special topics course that is designed to afford students the opportunity to examine topics not covered by the existing curriculum. Students are permitted to substitute up to two special topics classes for other courses required in their concentration. Special topic courses are offered quarterly, and the topics for these will vary.

HIST484 Special Topic: History Summer (3 semester hours)

This is a special topics course that is designed to afford students the opportunity to examine topics not covered by the existing curriculum. Students are permitted to substitute up to two special topics classes for other courses required in their concentration. Special topic courses are offered quarterly, and the topics for these will vary.

HIST490 Independent Study: History (3 semester hours)

An opportunity for History students to pursue an independent research project or examine a specific area of history under the mentorship of a single professor. Course is open to History majors only. The course will typically involve a major research paper; there will be no examination. Students will submit a proposal prior to the start of the project, and a rough draft of the paper, both of which will count toward the final grade. To be eligible for an independent study, students must be enrolled in a bachelors degree program, must have completed 24 hours at APUS toward their current degree program, and should have already contacted a professor and gained approval for the independent study topic. Once these conditions are met the student should contact his/her academic advisor. Once the course is open the student must complete an official online registration for the course. (Prerequisite - HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only).

HIST491 Writing a Research Proposal (3 semester hours)

Preparation for the BA in History and Military History Capstone seminar begins on day one of a student's program of study. The theories, research methods and analytical skills, and substantive knowledge obtained through their BA curriculum provide the basis for the Senior Seminar. Students are required to develop primary and secondary source materials on their research topic and address the writing requirements as described in the syllabus and classroom assignments. The research proposal must provide a clear description of a question or problem and a proposed method of answering the question or solving the problem. This course should be the LAST course in your program prior to HIST498/MILH498 and should not be taken earlier in your program.

HIST498 Senior Seminar in History (3 semester hours)

The Senior Seminar in History is designed to integrate the student's past work in their major field of study and to review as well as strengthen their understanding of their focus area in history. After a review of the student’s academic experience, the student and professor will design a course of study to round out the student’s preparation for research and writing a major paper in their field of interest. (Prerequisite: HIST491)