ELEN100 Introduction to Electrical Engineering (3 semester hours)

This is an introductory course that incorporates labs and project based learning. The course uses the IEEE Code of Ethics to apply ethics to engineering scenarios, as well as research the Electrical Engineering field and apply engineering design principles that will be used in Electrical Engineering courses. Students will examine and explore various electrical engineering concepts and components and use them to build working projects that sense temperature, read switches, write data to displays, drive LEDs, and generate audio signals. Students will use graphical system software to verify project performance. NOTE: This course requires the student to purchase additional materials that are not covered by the book grant. Please refer to the Course Materials section for additional details.

ELEN300 Electrical Engineering Fundamentals (4 semester hours)

The purpose of this course is to present the foundational areas of electrical engineering. The topics touched on in this course will help students determine their area of concentration at APUS. The topics included with varying degrees of emphasis include: Circuit Analysis; Electromagnetic Field Theory; Solid-state electronics; Electric machines; Electric power systems; Digital logic circuits; Computer systems; Electro-optics; Instrumentation systems; Control Systems.NOTE: This course requires the student to purchase additional materials that are not covered by the book grant. Please refer to the Course Materials section for additional details.Prerequisites: SCIN234 and MATH240.

ELEN303 Measurements and Instrumentation (3 semester hours)

This course will present important measurement techniques and instruments used in electrical engineering. The course provides an overview of the modern International System of Units (SI), including important units outside the SI standard. The course continues by introducing measurement errors, measurement uncertainty, and instrumentation limits on errors. The course introduces measurement elements such as resistors, capacitors, inductors, and laboratory voltage sources, and analog measuring instruments. The course describes compensation measurement methods and introduces AC and DC calibration techniques. Additionally, the course demonstrates the uses and testing methods of instrument transformers, operational amplifiers (op-amps), and oscilloscopes. The course describes the construction of the digital voltmeter and provides an overview of analog to digital converters. Finally, the course describes various measurement systems including the most popular sensors, signal conditioning, computer algorithms, and data acquisition hardware.NOTE: This course requires the student to purchase additional materials that are not covered by the book grant. Please refer to the Course Materials section for additional details.Prerequisites: SCIN234 and MATH240.

ELEN305 Electrical Circuit Analysis (4 semester hours)

This course presents circuit elements and defines them in terms of their circuit equations. These equations utilize the fundamental laws of circuit analysis. This course will introduce Ohm’s law, Kirchhoff’s law, and Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits, and superposition. This includes the introduction of series and parallel circuits, DC/AC circuit’s analysis, and power analysis of DC and AC circuits. An introduction to time domain and frequency analysis will be provided.NOTE: This course requires the student to purchase additional materials that are not covered by the book grant. Please refer to the Course Materials section for additional details.Prerequisites: ELEN300 and ELEN303.

ELEN306 Analog Circuit Theory (4 semester hours)

This course presents basic elements in analog circuit design. Initially operational amplifiers will be discussed, including design and implementation of practical amplifier and feedback circuits. Other analog elements such as diodes and transistors will be introduced combined with previously discussed passive components to design DC power supplies, audio amplifiers, active filters and oscillators along with other applications. Students will gain a fundamental understanding of the key analog circuit components and the basic skills to create and implement practical designs.NOTE: This course requires the student to purchase additional materials that are not covered by the book grant. Please refer to the Course Materials section for additional details.Prerequisites: ELEN305.

ELEN307 Digital Circuit Theory (4 semester hours)

This course presents digital and logic circuit analysis and design. The course covers six main parts: Boolean algebra and Boolean function simplification; basic logic gates, combinational functional blocks, and combinational circuit design using gates and functional blocks; digital circuit description by VHDL language; basic flip-flops, sequential circuit analysis and design; registers, static and dynamic memories, ROM and RAM, programmable logic devices, and field programmable gate arrays (FPGA’s); and register transfer language, basic computer structure, operation and design. Students will be introduced to the concepts of digital circuit theory and design, will practice with circuit analysis software, will gain solid skills to analyze and design digital circuits for various applications, and will get familiar with the structure and operation of a digital processor.NOTE: This course requires the student to purchase additional materials that are not covered by the book grant. Please refer to the Course Materials section for additional details.Prerequisites: ELEN305.

ELEN310 Continuous and Discrete Signals and Systems (4 semester hours)

This course is presents signal and system description and characterization in the time and frequency domains for linear time-invariant (LTIV) systems. Time domain topics include differential and difference equations; convolution; and Fourier Series. Frequency domain material will incorporate Fourier transforms; Laplace transforms; z-transforms; and system description via transfer functions. The sampling theorem will be addressed. State-space representation of LTIV systems in either the time or frequency domains will be introduced. The course will show students how to characterize and analyze systems in either time or frequency and transform between domains. Students will be shown how to determine and apply a correct technique to either analyze an existing system or design a system to meet specifications. NOTE: This course requires the student to purchase additional materials that are not covered by the book grant. Please refer to the Course Materials section for additional details.(Prerequisites: ELEN305 and MATH210)

ELEN312 Energy Conversion Processes and Systems (3 semester hours)

This course presents concepts related to energy conversion and transport and provides the foundation for understanding power generation and distribution. Energy conversion in electrical, electromagnetic, electromechanical and electrochemical systems will be discussed. Different forms of power generation, both AC and DC, will be covered along with single-phase and three-phase power, transmission lines, and transformers. The course will also cover AC and DC motors, motor control, power measurement, switches and rectifiers. An introduction to power electronics will be also be presented, demonstrating the circuits used to interface both traditional and emerging alternative energy sources to the existing distribution system and homes. The course will center on a practical understanding of individual components and applying this knowledge to discussions of large and small scale energy systems, Students will gain the fundamental skill set to understand our electrical grid and power generation.NOTE: This course requires the student to purchase additional materials that are not covered by the book grant. Please refer to the Course Materials section for additional details.(Prerequisites: ELEN305 and ELEN325)

ELEN325 Field Theory (3 semester hours)

This course teaches the physics and applications of electromagnetic field theory as encapsulated in the vector form of Maxwell's equations. The class will show how these laws govern the design and bound the performance of electronic devices, circuits, and systems. This course covers the following topics from field theory to include magnetic materials and forces, inductance, Coulomb‘s law, Gauss’s Law, energy, divergence, electrical potential, conductors, dielectrics materials, capacitance, Ampere’s Law, boundary value problems, Biot-Savart Law, Ampere‘s law, Lorentz force equation, magnetic materials, magnetic circuits, inductance, time varying fields and Maxwell‘s equations. As part of the course, students will develop Maxwell’s Equations from electric and magnetic field experimental laws. This course will also cover wave propagation in free space and in transmission lines and characteristics of radiating structures such as antennas. Prerequisites: MATH227 and MATH240.

ELEN416 Control Systems Theory and Design (3 semester hours)

This course covers the basic principles of frequency- and time-domain design techniques. Classical methods covered include Laplace transforms and transfer functions; root locus design; Routh-Hurwitz stability analysis; frequency response methods including Bode, Nyquist, and Nichols; steady state error for standard test signals; second order system approximations; and phase and gain margin and bandwidth. In addition, the state variable method is investigated including full state feedback design, and limitations of state variable feedback. The student will learn to use computers in the analysis and design of control systems.NOTE: This course requires the student to purchase additional materials that are not covered by the book grant. Please refer to the Course Materials section for additional details.Prerequisites: ELEN310.

ELEN420 Communication Systems (3 semester hours)

The course covers statistical communication theory including amplitude, frequency, and pulse code modulation; description of random process by auto-correlation and power spectral density functions, sources and properties of electrical noise and its effect on communication systems, the effects of modulation, detection and filtering on signal information content, and bandwidth and signal-to-noise ratio. Topics include: a review of signals and systems, power spectral density, amplitude modulation, angle modulation, pulse modulation, a review of probability and random variables, and an introduction to digital transmission systems.NOTE: This course requires the student to purchase additional materials that are not covered by the book grant. Please refer to the Course Materials section for additional details.(Prerequisites: ELEN310, ELEN325 AND MATH302 OR MATH328)

ELEN421 RF/Microwave Engineering I (3 semester hours)

This course covers the fundamental concepts of passive microwave circuit analysis and design. Topics include electromagnetic theory, propagation of electromagnetic waves in various transmission media, microwave network analysis, the Smith Chart, impedance matching & tuning, resonators, power dividers, directional couplers, and microwave filters. At the end of this course, you will have an understanding of the key concepts and components associated with passive microwave circuits.NOTE: This course requires the student to purchase additional materials that are not covered by the book grant. Please refer to the Course Materials section for additional details.Prerequisites: ELEN310 and ELEN420.

ELEN422 RF/Microwave Engineering II (4 semester hours)

This course expands upon the knowledge gained in ELEN421 RF/Microwave Engineering I. It introduces active microwave components and the cascading of components to form microwave circuits, sub-systems, and systems. Topics include amplifiers, mixers, receivers, frequency synthesizers, modulators, wireless systems and typical figures of merit such as gain, noise figure and third order intercept point. At the end of this course, you will have an understanding of the key concepts and basic theories associated with microwave circuits and systems.NOTE: This course requires the student to purchase additional materials that are not covered by the book grant. Please refer to the Course Materials section for additional details.Prerequisites: ELEN421.

ELEN423 Wireless Communications (4 semester hours)

The course presents fundamental principles underlying the wireless transmission and reception of information, and studies the different parts of a modern wireless communication system. Specifically, the course will touch upon different digital modulation schemes, as well as the design and performance analysis of a transmission and reception end. The concept of diversity and its impact on reception performance (probability of symbol detection error) will be discussed. Channel capacity and channel coding will also be studied. Further, techniques for adaptive modulation and channel equalization used in state-of-the art wireless systems will be presented. Communication using orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM), as well as spread spectrum techniques will also covered. Topics in multi-user systems, random access, cellular systems and ad hoc networks will also be covered. The goal of this course is to help students to i) learn about different wireless communication technologies; ii) understand the basic components of a wireless communication system; iii) be able to design basic components in a wireless communication system; and iv) analyze its performance both analytically and numerically.NOTE: This course requires the student to purchase additional materials that are not covered by the book grant. Please refer to the Course Materials section for additional details.Prerequisites: ELEN420 AND ELEN310.

ELEN426 Antennas-Theory and Applications (3 semester hours)

This course is an in-depth coverage of the basic properties of antenna theory, analysis, and design. Topics covered include radiation patterns; antenna gain and directivity; antenna main lobe and side lobe levels and shaping; system losses; and antenna impedances. Different types of antennas including linear dipoles; horns; slot antennas; and linear and planar array antennas will be examined. Students will be introduced to numerical methods for analysis and modeling as well as the effects of RF frequency on antenna design.NOTE: This course requires the student to purchase additional materials that are not covered by the book grant. Please refer to the Course Materials section for additional details.Prerequisites: ELEN420.

ELEN427 Radar Systems Theory (4 semester hours)

This course is an in-depth coverage of the theory of radar and RF signal propagation, transmission, and reception. Topics covered include the radar range equation; antenna patterns; target cross section; system losses; calculation of signal-to-interference ratios; detection probability; target scintillation; main lobe and side lobe clutter; and moving target indicator (MTI) and pulse Doppler processing. Radar system hardware including transmitters, receivers, and antennas will be introduced and system block diagrams created. Classification of radar types into search, track, or mapping systems will be discussed.NOTE: This course requires the student to purchase additional materials that are not covered by the book grant. Please refer to the Course Materials section for additional details.Prerequisites: ELEN420.

ELEN430 Embedded Systems Design (3 semester hours)

The fundamentals of embedded system hardware and firmware design will be covered in this course. The main topics to be discussed are: embedded processor selection, hardware/firmware partitioning, glue logic, circuit design, circuit layout, circuit debugging, development tools, firmware architecture, firmware design, and firmware debugging. The Atmel AVR series microcontroller will be studied. The architecture and instruction set of the microcontroller will be discussed. A microcontroller development board will be utilized as a development and debugging platform. The course will culminate in a significant final project and will include interfacing real world peripherals to the microcontroller to perform some specific task. Depending on the interests of the students and professor, other relevant topics may be covered.NOTE: This course requires the student to purchase additional materials that are not covered by the book grant. Please refer to the Course Materials section for additional details.(Prerequisites: ELEN307 AND ENGR200)

ELEN432 Microcontroller Based Systems (3 semester hours)

This course is an introduction to microcontroller based systems. Topics in the class include microprocessor/microcontroller organization, instruction sets, assembly language programming, analog and digital interfacing, and design of microcontroller based systems. Emphasis is on design, labs and projects in the course, including written and oral communication for project summaries and results.Prerequisite: ELEN307.

ELEN435 Introduction to Power Electronics (4 semester hours)

This course takes a student with a basic understanding of circuit analysis and introduces them to the functionality, topography, and regulation of power electronic devices. Students will become skilled in power computations based on load design, conversion of DC/DC, DC/AC, AC/DC, and AC/AC circuits, rectifiers, voltage controllers, power supplies, inverters, and operations of semiconductor devices, and basic switching circuits. Students will also delve into software tools with embedded power electronic equations to simulate and investigate the behavior of power electronic circuits under various load settings and heat sync scenarios. They will also utilize software to experiment and manipulate power electronic equations and observe voltage and current waveforms.NOTE: This course requires the student to purchase additional materials that are not covered by the book grant. Please refer to the Course Materials section for additional details.Prerequisites: ELEN306 AND ELEN325.

ELEN436 Advanced Power Electronics (4 semester hours)

This course takes a student with prior knowledge of electrical machines, power converters, and linear control systems and provides knowledge of advances in power electronics such as modeling DC motor drives and machines, various modes of operation, multi-phase control converters and choppers. Students will design multiple-order transfer functions, experiment with closed loop operation of DC motor drives, a speed controlled drive system, pulse-width modulation and steady state analysis. The skills gained in this course will enable students to perform various tasks related to high power semiconductor devices, digital signal processing, and efficient electrical energy. Motor drives have wide spread applications in today’s industry such as machine tools, elevators, cranes, transportation, and an extensive list of other modern applications. NOTE: This course requires the student to purchase additional materials that are not covered by the book grant. Please refer to the Course Materials section for additional details.Prerequisite: ELEN435.

ELEN440 Mechatronics (4 semester hours)

This course covers the foundational concepts in mechatronics. It introduces students to the required skills necessary to design a complete mechatronic system. Students will learn about the use and integration of sensors, actuators, microcontrollers, and various types of software required to interact with hardware. Students will gain a system-of-systems approach to designing a complete mechatronics system and how to structure and interface to electromechanical systems. They will also gain practical experience through laboratory exercises in design of graphical user interfaces and real-time operating systems needed to control mechatronic systems. Students will also design feedback control systems with time and task constraints.NOTE: This course requires the student to purchase additional materials that are not covered by the book grant. Please refer to the Course Materials section for additional details.Prerequisites: ELEN312 AND ELEN416.

ELEN498 Senior Seminar Design (3 semester hours)

This seminar is a senior-level course designed to allow the student to review, analyze and integrate the work the student has completed toward a degree in electrical engineering. The student will design an approved project that demonstrates mastery of their program of study in a meaningful culmination of their learning and to assess their level of mastery of the stated outcomes of their degree requirements. Prerequisite: Student must have Senior standing in our Engineering program and Program Director approval to register.NOTE: This course requires the student to purchase additional materials that are not covered by the book grant. Please refer to the Course Materials section for additional details.

ELEN499 Senior Seminar Project (3 semester hours)

After completing the design of their approved project in ELEN498 - Senior Seminar Design, students will implement that design into a working prototype and write a senior thesis. The senior thesis will be completed and an oral defense presented. Selected senior papers will be retained in our library. The student is further encouraged to submit work to peer reviewed journals, conference proceedings, and/or senior design competitions. NOTE: This course requires the student to purchase additional materials that are not covered by the book grant. Please refer to the Course Materials section for additional details.Prerequisite: ELEN498.