BIOL133 General Biology I with Lab (4 semester hours)

This course provides a foundational basis for the study of basic biology. It is the first in a two-part biology series that is designed for students who intend to complete a degree that requires a majors-level biology course. Topics in in this course include an introduction to the molecular basis of life, biology of the cell, genetic and molecular biology, evolution and diversity of life on Earth. The laboratory portion of this course will include hands-on as well as virtual laboratories that complement the topics and concepts covered in the lecture component. Some of the laboratory activities require the use of glass or sharp laboratory instruments; therefore, students must have a safe work area available to perform laboratory activities. Students must also have room temperature storage available in order to maintain laboratory materials and specimens and access to very hot or boiling water. In addition, students must be able to document their laboratory work using still pictures and/or video.

BIOL134 General Biology II with Lab (4 semester hours)

This course is the second in a two part biology series that is designed for students who intend to complete a degree that requires a majors-level biology course. Topics included in this course diversity of life on Earth, plant form and function, animal form and function, and ecology and behavior. The laboratory portion of this course will include hands-on as well as virtual laboratories that complement the topics and concepts covered in the lecture component. As part of the hands-on laboratory component, students are required to perform dissection of preserved animal specimens. Some of the laboratory activities require the use of glass or sharp laboratory instruments; therefore students must have a safe work area available to perform laboratory activities. Students must also have room temperature storage available in order to maintain laboratory materials and specimens. In addition, students must be able to document their laboratory work using still pictures and/or video. NOTE: This course requires the student to purchase additional materials that are not covered by the book grant. Please refer to the Course Materials section for additional details. (Prerequisite: BIOL133)

BIOL180 Introduction to Biology (3 semester hours)

This course introduces students to the biological systems within their associated environments. The course furnishes an understanding of biological principles and the properties of life. Topics covered in this course include the structure and function of plants and animals, cell biology principles, genetics, reproduction, development and growth, biological diversity, principles of evolution, and interactions among organisms and with their environment. Students will discuss the process of the scientific method and also demonstrate science information literacy skills through source selection and creation of a narrated presentation.

BIOL181 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 semester hours)

This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of biology emphasizing the structure and function of the human body. The course will begin with a general introduction to biology and the scientific method. It continues with an overview of organic chemistry, a study of cellular and tissue structure and function, the organization and regulation of body systems, and then move on to survey each of the following organ systems of the human body: cardiovascular, lymphatic, and immune, digestive, respiratory, urinary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, and reproductive. The course closes with introductions to genetics, and human evolution and ecology. Students will discuss the process of the scientific method and also demonstrate science information literacy skills through source selection and creation of a narrated presentation.

BIOL201 Principles of Anatomy and Physiology with Lab (4 semester hours)

This course introduces students to the fundamental principles associated with the structure and function of the human body. It is intended to prepare students for careers in the health sciences and healthcare systems (medical assisting, medical technology, radiologic technology, respiratory therapy, health information management, medical coding, etc.). Lessons and laboratory exercises focus on the organization, microscopic and gross anatomy, and the functions of the integumentary, musculoskeletal, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems of the human body. The basics of chemistry and cell biology are introduced in order to provide the foundation for discussion of the individual organ systems. This course includes a hands-on laboratory component, and students are required to perform dissection of preserved animal specimens. Some of the laboratory activities require the use of glass or sharp laboratory instruments; therefore, students must have a safe work area available to perform laboratory activities. Students must also have room temperature storage available in order to maintain laboratory materials and specimens. Refrigerated storage is not required. In addition, students must be able to document their laboratory work using still pictures and/or video. This is a time and resource-intensive course. Students intending to pursue a career in the health sciences should verify that this course meets the requirements of their intended program prior to enrollment. NOTE: Students may take either BIOL201 or BIOL250/BIOL251 for credit, but not both versions of anatomy & physiology.

BIOL202 Principles of Microbiology with Lab (4 semester hours)

This course includes the study of the history of Microbiology, as well as the fundamentals of microbe staining, culture and growth. We will also focus on sterilization, disinfection and antimicrobial therapies that help to keep microbes in check. Finally, the course will focus on microbial infections of the skin, eyes and wounds as well as the urogenital, respiratory, oral gastrointestinal and nervous systems. This course includes a laboratory component that allows the student to explore exercises in the principles and concepts of microbiology. This course is designed for students with interests in basic science, microbiology and the medical professions. NOTE: Students may take either BIOL202 or SCIN202 for credit, but not both versions of microbiology. (Prerequisites: BIOL133 or SCIN130)

BIOL240 Elements of Biological Chemistry (3 semester hours)

This course introduces students to the fundamental principles associated with the structure and function of the macromolecules that sustain living systems. The course will begin with a general introduction to organic chemistry including the molecules and functional groups that set this category of chemistry apart from the others. Topics will then move on to more specific molecules such as carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids along with the cellular processes involved in building and metabolizing these macromolecules. Additional details regarding biology at the cellular and molecular level will include topics such as nutrition, body fluids, pH and cellular respiration. (Prerequisites: CHEM134 and BIOL134)

BIOL241 Cell Biology (3 semester hours)

This cell biology course will provide a detailed understanding of the fundamental processes of cellular functions. The course will include aspects of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells as both often share similar mechanisms. In the first half of the course, the focus is on the macro-­-level with an exploration of basic cell characteristics, cellular membranes, cellular respiration and how cells interact with the environment. In the second half of the course, the focus is on genetics with a look at chromosomes, genes, gene expression, how cell accomplish DNA replication, repair errors that can result in DNA, how cells reproduce, how cells communicate, and finally we will explore the relationship between cancer and the immune system at the cellular level. (Prerequisites: BIOL134 and CHEM134)

BIOL242 Evolutionary Biology (3 semester hours)

The goal of this course is to examine the fundamental concepts of evolutionary theory. This course will include a survey of historic and current scientific methods and data in the study of biological evolution. Topics include natural selection, genetic drift, adaptation, sexual selection, speciation, and coevolution. Applications of evolution to current global issues and problems will be demonstrated. Students will use discussions, assignments, readings, and projects to illustrate evolutionary concepts.

BIOL250 Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab I (4 semester hours)

This is the first of a two-course sequence in human anatomy & physiology. This intensive course is intended to prepare students for careers in the health sciences (sports medicine, physical therapy, EMS nursing, physician assistant, etc.). Lessons and laboratory exercises focus on the organization of the human body, homeostasis, basic chemistry, cell biology, genetics and heredity, and the integumentary musculoskeletal, and nervous systems. This course includes a hands-on laboratory component, and students are required to perform dissection of preserved animal specimens. Some of the laboratory activities require the use of glass or sharp laboratory instruments; therefore, students must have a safe work area available to perform laboratory activities. Students must also have room temperature storage available in order to maintain laboratory materials and specimens through both BIOL250 and BIOL251. Refrigerated storage is not required. In addition, students must be able to document their laboratory work using still pictures and/or video. This is a time and resource-intensive course. Students intending to pursue a career in the health sciences should verify that the BIOL250 and BIOL251 course sequence meets the requirements of their intended program prior to enrollment. Lab material for this course will only be provided once. If you need replacement lab equipment for any reason or need to retake the course later, you will need to purchase your own lab refills. NOTE: Students may take either BIOL201or BIOL250/BIOL251 for credit, but not both versions of anatomy & physiology. (Prerequisites: CHEM133 or SCIN131, and MATH110, MATH111, or MATH225)

BIOL251 Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab II (4 semester hours)

This is the second of a two-course sequence in human anatomy & physiology. This intensive course is intended to prepare students for careers in the health sciences (sports medicine, physical therapy, EMS, nursing, physician assistant, etc.). Lessons and laboratory exercises focus on homeostasis, metabolism, acid-base balance, growth and development, and the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, urinary, digestive, and reproductive systems. Students are also required to successfully complete a cumulative assessment of anatomy & physiology objectives from both BIOL250 and BIOL251. This course includes a hands-on laboratory component, and students are required to perform dissection of preserved animal specimens. Some of the laboratory activities require the use of glass or sharp laboratory instruments; therefore, students must have a safe work area available to perform laboratory activities. Students must also have room temperature storage available in order to maintain laboratory materials and specimens through both BIOL250 and BIOL251. Refrigerated storage is not required. In addition, students must be able to document their laboratory work using still pictures and/or video. Lab material for this course will only be provided once. If you need replacement lab equipment for any reason or need to retake the course later, you will need to purchase your own lab refills. NOTE: Students may take either BIOL201 or BIOL250/BIOL251 for credit, but not both versions of anatomy & physiology. (Prerequisite: BIOL250)

BIOL301 Molecular Biology (3 semester hours)

This molecular biology course will provide a detailed understanding of the structure, function, and regulation of DNA, RNA and proteins. The first half of the course will focus on the basic biochemical properties of DNA, RNA and proteins to establish and understanding of how these molecules function. The second half of the course will focus on transcription, translation, and regulation of these processes and finally the real-world application of molecular biology. (Prerequisite: SCIN211)

BIOL342 Evolutionary Biology with Lab (4 semester hours)

The goal of this course is to examine the fundamental concepts of evolutionary theory. This course will include a survey of historic and current scientific methods and data in the study of biological evolution. Topics include natural selection, genetic drift, adaptation, sexual selection, speciation, and coevolution. Applications of evolution to current global issues and problems will be demonstrated. Students will use discussions, assignments, readings, and projects to illustrate evolutionary concepts. (Prerequisites: BIOL134 and SCIN211)