The Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy is a liberal arts program designed to expose students to the fundamentals of Western philosophy. This is accomplished through courses designed to explore the history of philosophy from Ancient through Postmodern periods, both Continental and Analytic traditions as well as Logic and Ethics.

Students are taught, through the use of logic and argumentation, to think critically and objectively, to write clearly and effectively, and to navigate complex intellectual, social, and legal issues. This online bachelor’s degree helps to prepare you for professions requiring a high level of analytical thought such as jobs in academia, intelligence, finance and business, healthcare, STEM, and the legal profession.

Degree Program Objectives

In addition to the institutional and degree level learning objectives, graduates of this program are expected to achieve these learning outcomes:

  • Examine the historical development and evolution of philosophy from its origins through contemporary times.
  • Evaluate the various schools of philosophical and moral thought as well as the historical context and the rationale behind their respective development.
  • Recognize and apply logic: what makes a deductive argument valid or an inductive argument strong.
  • Evaluate various criteria for justifying claims of knowledge and morality
  • Originate philosophical positions in written compositions and critically analyze philosophical questions.
  • Apply philosophical inquiry to contemporary events.

Degree at a Glance

General Education Requirements30
Major Required36
Select one of the following concentrations:15
Final Program Requirements3
Elective Requirements36
Total Semester Hours120

Degree Program Requirements

General Education Requirements (30 semester hours)

Arts and Humanities (6 semester hours) 1
Select 2 courses from the following:6
Arabic I
Arabic II
Art Appreciation
Film and Literature
Image Enhancement using Adobe Photoshop
French I
French II
German I
German II
Introduction to Japanese
Literature of American Encounters, Revolution, and Rebellion
From Abolition to #MeToo: Literature of the American Civil Rights Movement
Pivotal Figures in Early British Literature
British Literature from Wordsworth through the Wasteland
Leadership in World Literature: Antiquity to the Early Modern Period
Literature of the Newly Globalized World: The Individual’s Struggle to Adapt
Music Appreciation
World Music and Cultures
Critical Thinking
Philosophy of Science
Introduction to Brazilian Portuguese
Introduction to World Religions
Russian I
Spanish I
Spanish II
Thinking and Acting Ethically
Civics, Political and Social Sciences (6 semester hours) 1
Select 2 courses from the following:6
Introduction to Anthropology
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Human Sexuality
Social Media and Society
Intercultural Communication
Microeconomics
Macroeconomics
Humane Education: A Global Interdisciplinary Perspective
Introduction to Geography
Practical Food Safety and Awareness
International Relations I
Forgotten America--Under Represented Cultures in American Literature
Four Points of the Compass: Culture and Society Around the World
Introduction to Political Science
American Government I
Introduction to Psychology
Introduction to Sociology
Social Problems
American Popular Culture
Exploring Society and Cultures via Science Fiction
Communication: Writing, Oral, and Multimedia (9 semester hours)
COMM120Information and Digital Literacy3
ENGL110Making Writing Relevant3
Select 1 course from the following:3
Public Speaking
Proficiency in Writing
Argumentation and Rhetoric
Introduction to Literature
Technical Writing
Scientific Writing
Effective Business Communication
Human Relations Communication
Information Literacy and Global Citizenship
Introduction to Information Technology Writing
Human Relations
History (3 semester hours)
Select 1 course from the following:3
American History to 1877
American History since 1877
World Civilization before 1650
World Civilization since 1650
Western Civilization before The Thirty Years War
Western Civilization since The Thirty Years War
African-American History before 1877
African-American History since 1877
History of the American Indian
History of Science
The History and Context of STEM
Mathematics and Applied Reasoning (3 semester hours)
Select 1 course from the following:3
Accounting for Non Accounting Majors
Fundamentals of Programming
College Algebra
College Trigonometry
Introduction to Statistics
Math for Liberal Arts Majors
Calculus
Natural Sciences (3 semester hours)
Select 1 course from the following:3
Introduction to Biology
Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology
Introduction to Chemistry
Introduction to Meteorology
Introduction to Geology
Introduction to Environmental Science
Introduction to Physics
Introduction to Astronomy
Introduction to STEM Disciplines
Total Semester Hours30

Major Required (36 semester hours)

PHIL101Introduction to Philosophy (Prerequisite for all Major Courses)3
PHIL200Introduction to Ethics3
COLL300Research, Analysis, and Writing3
PHIL300Logic3
Select 8 courses from the following:24
Critical Thinking
Philosophy of Science
Ancient Western Philosophy
Medieval Philosophy
Contemporary Issues in Philosophy
Metaphysics and Epistemology
God and World
Religious Existentialism
Enlightenment Philosophy
Modern & Post-Modern Philosophy
Analytical Philosophy
Total Semester Hours36

Students must choose a concentration for this degree program and may select from a  Concentration in Ethics, Concentration in Healthcare, Concentration in Legal Theory, or a Concentration in STEM.

Concentration in Ethics (15 semester hours)

Ethics is becoming an increasingly important concern in different fields of endeavor from Wall Street to Main Street and from the playground to the battleground. What constitutes right action? Are we doing the right things? What should we be doing to ensure a good life for us, our families, our nation, and our world?

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this concentration, the student will be able to:

  • Engage the philosophical theories underpinning ethical theories and judgment.
  • Assess the importance of individual moral behavior and communal ethical standards and the relationship between the two.
  • Explore the influences of religion, politics and psychology on ethical theories and choices.
  • Assess standard models of ethics for their strengths and weaknesses.
  • Apply ethical theories to particular situations in leadership, military, business, health care, government, and environmental contexts.

Concentration Requirements (15 semester hours)

PBHE215Healthcare: Moral Issues3
CMRJ308Ethics in Criminal Justice3
COMM280Ethics in Communication3
MGMT314Management Ethics3
PHIL320Environmental Ethics3
Total Semester Hours15

Concentration in Healthcare (15 semester hours)

The Healthcare Concentration allows philosophy students who are going into healthcare as a career to have a strong foundation in healthcare ideas, concepts, and issues by taking healthcare courses.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this concentration, the student will be able to:

  • Develop an understanding of healthcare needs and practices.
  • Apply philosophical reasoning, logic, and ethics to healthcare topics.
  • Examine career opportunities in healthcare that intersect with philosophy.

Concentration Requirements (15 semester hours)

PHIL340Bioethics3
Select 4 courses from the following:12
Introduction to Health Care Administration
Health Services Organization
Wellness: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
Public Health in America
Healthcare: Moral Issues
Legal and Ethical Principles in Healthcare
Healthcare Principles and Policies
Medical Terminology
Introduction to Health Information Management
Healthcare Delivery Systems and Documentation
Electronics Health Records Fundamentals
Health Informatics Project and Enterprise Management
Informatics and Analytics
Healthcare Data Management and Governance
Total Semester Hours15

Concentration in Legal Theory (15 semester hours)

The Legal Theory Concentration allows philosophy students who are going into law as a career to have a strong foundation in legal ideas, concepts, theories, and practices by taking law courses.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this concentration, the student will be able to:

  • Develop an understanding of legal thoughts and practices.
  • Apply philosophical reasoning, logic, and ethics to legal topics.
  • Examine career opportunities in law that intersect with philosophy.

Concentration Requirements (15 semester hours)

PHIL330Philosophy of Law3
Select 4 courses from the following:12
Introduction to the Courts
Civil Practice and Procedure
Legal Ethics
Ethics in Criminal Justice
Law and Ethics in the Business Environment
Administrative Law and Policy
Constitutional Law
Criminal Law
Family Law
Military Law
Legal Issues in Information Security
Cyberlaw and Privacy in a Digital Age
Immigration Law and Policy
Sociology of the Law
Total Semester Hours15

Concentration in STEM (15 semester hours)

The purpose of the STEM Concentration is to allow students who are pursuing careers aligned with STEM to supplement the Philosophy core with specific courses to aid in that endeavor.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this concentration, the student will be able to:

  • Develop an understanding of thoughts and practices associated with STEM fields.
  • Apply philosophical reasoning, logic, and ethics to STEM topics.
  • Examine career opportunities in STEM that intersect with philosophy.

Concentration Requirements (15 semester hours)

Select 5 courses from the following:15
Physical Geography
College Trigonometry
Analytic Geometry
Environmental Economics
Discrete Mathematics
Linear Algebra
Introduction to Computer Science
Web Development Fundamentals
Calculus
Environmental Ethics
Legal Issues in Information Security
Management Information Systems
Environmental Policy, Regulation, and Law
Total Semester Hours15

Final Program Requirements (3 semester hours)

PHRL498Religion and Philosophy Capstone (to be taken as the last course before graduation) 13
Total Semester Hours3

Elective Requirements (36 semester hours)

Select any courses that have not been used to fulfill major or concentration requirements. Credits applied toward a minor or certificate in an unrelated field may be used to fulfill elective credit for the major.