The Bachelor of Arts in International Relations analyzes the nature of modern global relationships and provides you with an improved understanding of diplomacy, foreign policy analysis, international organizations, global development, and international relations theory. This online bachelor’s degree explores the interconnectedness of global economies, societies, and cultures. You will focus on civic engagement and social responsibility while developing broad critical thinking skills in politics, economics, culture, and history. This online program provides an excellent foundation for careers in government agencies, the diplomatic service, international organizations, world trade and finance, and international media careers.

Degree Program Objectives

Graduates of this degree will be able to:

  • Distinguish the political, economic, social, and security theories, methods, and historic patterns of international relations as applied to contemporary issues and actors within the world system.
  • Explain the process and implications of interdependence among individuals, groups, states, and regions in the context of globalization.
  • Analyze the theories, assumptions, and causes of conflict within international systems as related to the institutions of international law, diplomacy, and world order, including the prospects for sustainable peace.
  • Assess the unique principles, structure, organization, and impact of international organizations and other non-state actors within the international system of states.
  • Evaluate the multidimensional effects of globalization and integration as applied to issues in human security, conflict resolution, and sustainable economic development.

Degree at a Glance

General Education Requirements30
Major Required18
Select one of the following concentrations:24
Final Program Requirements3
Elective Requirements45
Total Semester Hours120

Degree Program Requirements

General Education Requirements (30 semester hours)

Arts and Humanities (6 semester hours) 1
Select 2 courses from the following:6
Art Appreciation
Film and Literature
Image Enhancement using Adobe Photoshop
World Literature through the Renaissance
World Literature since the Renaissance
English Literature: Beowulf to18th Century
English Literature: 18th Century to Present
American Literature before The Civil War
American Literature from The Civil War to Present
Arabic I
Arabic II
French I
French II
German I
German II
Introduction to Japanese
Music Appreciation
Introduction to Philosophy
Critical Thinking
Introduction to Ethics
Philosophy of Science
Introduction to Brazilian Portuguese
Introduction to World Religions
Russian I
Spanish I
Spanish II
Civics, Political and Social Sciences (6 semester hours) 1
Select 2 courses from the following:6
Introduction to Anthropology
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Human Sexuality
Social Media and Society
Intercultural Communication
Microeconomics
Macroeconomics
Humane Education: A Global Interdisciplinary Perspective
Introduction to Geography
Practical Food Safety and Awareness
International Relations I
Contemporary World Culture Through Literature
Cultural Diversity in Contemporary American Literature
American Government I
Introduction to Psychology
Introduction to Sociology
Social Problems
American Popular Culture
Communication: Writing, Oral, and Multimedia (8 semester hours)
COMM110Information & Digital Literacy2
ENGL110Making Writing Relevant3
IRLS200Information Literacy and Global Citizenship3
History (3 semester hours)
Select 1 course from the following:3
American History to 1877
American History since 1877
World Civilization before 1650
World Civilization since 1650
Western Civilization before The Thirty Years War
Western Civilization since The Thirty Years War
African-American History before 1877
African-American History since 1877
History of the American Indian
History of Science
Mathematics and Applied Reasoning (3 semester hours)
Select 1 course from the following:3
Accounting for Non Accounting Majors
Fundamentals of Programming
College Algebra
College Trigonometry
Introduction to Statistics
Math for Liberal Arts Majors
Calculus
Natural Sciences with Lab (4 semester hours)
Select 1 course from the following:4
Habitable Worlds Are We Alone with Lab
Introduction to Biology with Lab
Introduction to Chemistry with Lab
Introduction to Human Anatomy & Physiology with Lab
Introduction to Physics with Lab
Introduction to Astronomy with Lab
Introduction to Meteorology with Lab
Introduction to Environmental Science with Lab
Total Semester Hours30
1

All literature courses require successful completion of ENGL101 - Proficiency in Writing or ENGL110 - Making Writing Relevant.

Major Required (18 semester hours)

IRLS210International Relations I3
IRLS211International Relations II3
IRLS214American Foreign Policy3
IRLS301International Organizations3
IRLS302International Development3
IRLS402International Law and Regimes3
Total Semester Hours18

Students must choose a concentration for this degree program and may select from either the Concentration in International Studies, Concentration in Comparative Politics, Concentration in Peacekeeping, Concentration in African Studies, Concentration in Asian Studies, Concentration in European Studies, Concentration in Latin American Studies, Concentration in Globalization and Human Security.

Concentration in African Studies (24 semester hours)

Probes the history, essential tenets, and central practices of different cultures within Sub-Saharan Africa, as well as the ethnic, tribal, cultural, and religious divides that exist there today. Also addresses the historical, sociological, economic, geographic, political, and defense factors as they relate to issues and events now and in the future.

Objectives

Students in this concentration undertake an in-depth examination of issues that affect the sub-Saharan African community and will be able to:

  • Compare and contrast the history, essential tenets, and central practices of different cultures within sub-Saharan Africa.
  • Explain the historical, sociological, economic, geographic, political, and defense factors as they relate to current events within sub-Saharan Africa.
  • Discuss the key issues that lie ahead for sub-Saharan Africa within the regions, but externally as well.
  • Assess the ethnic, tribal, cultural, and religious divides that exist in sub-Saharan Africa and their impact on internal and regional stability.

Concentration Requirements (24 semester hours)

IRLS300Comparative Political Systems3
IRLS322African Politics3
IRLS392Globalization and the Market Economy3
IRLS412Comparative Foreign Policy3
Select 4 courses from the following:12
Political Geography
Introduction to Human Security
History of Africa
African Literature
Islam
Total Semester Hours24

Concentration in Asian Studies (24 semester hours)

Evaluates various sociological, historical, economic, geographic, political, and defense factors as they relate to current events within Asia. Assesses ethnic, tribal, cultural, and religious divides that exist in Asia and their impact on internal and regional stability.

Objectives

Students in this concentration undertake an in-depth examination of issues that affect the Asian community and will be able to:

  • Compare and contrast the history, essential tenets, and central practices of different cultures within various Asian societies.
  • Explain the historical, sociological, economic, geographic, political, and defense factors as they relate to current events within Asia.
  • Discuss the key issues that lie ahead for Asian relations within the regions, but externally as well.
  • Assess the ethnic, tribal, cultural, and religious divides that exist in Asia and their impact on internal and regional stability. 

Concentration Requirements (24 semester hours)

HIST230History of East Asia3
IRLS213Political Geography3
IRLS300Comparative Political Systems3
IRLS310Introduction to Human Security3
IRLS331Asian Politics3
IRLS392Globalization and the Market Economy3
IRLS412Comparative Foreign Policy3
TLMT442International Trade and Regulations3
Total Semester Hours24

Concentration in Comparative Politics (24 semester hours)

Takes an in-depth look at politics in systematic and comparative terms by focusing on domestic politics in various countries. Explores the political history, social background, culture, and institutions of those countries; the roles of various actors in developing and implementing domestic and international policy; and globalization’s impact on public policies.

Objectives

Students in this concentration undertake an in-depth examination of cross-national analysis. Students will learn how to think about politics in systematic and comparative terms by focusing on the domestic politics in a variety of countries and will be able to:

  • Comprehend the roles of various actors in the development and implementation of both domestic and international policy.
  • Explore the political history, social background, culture, and institutions of various countries.
  • Identify the various manifestations of globalization and its impact on various public policies as they relate to cultural, economic, political, and social institutions. 

Concentration Requirements (24 semester hours)

IRLS213Political Geography3
IRLS300Comparative Political Systems3
IRLS392Globalization and the Market Economy3
IRLS412Comparative Foreign Policy3
Select 4 courses from the following:12
African Politics
Asian Politics
Government and Security of Russia
European Politics
Latin American Politics
Government & Security in the Middle East
Arab-Israeli Conflict: Contemp. Politics & Dipl.
Total Semester Hours24

Concentration in European Studies (24 semester hours)

Explores various sociological, historical, economic, geographic, political, and defense factors as they relate to current events within Europe. Topics include essential tenets and central practices of different cultures within various European societies, as well as ethnic, tribal, cultural, and religious divides that exist in Europe and their impact on internal and regional stability.

Objective

Students in this concentration undertake an in-depth examination of issues that affect the European community and will be able to:

  • Compare and contrast the history, essential tenets, and central practices of different cultures within various European societies.
  • Explain the historical, sociological, economic, geographic, political, and defense factors as they relate to current events within Europe.
  • Discuss the key issues that lie ahead for European relations within the regions, but externally as well.
  • Assess the ethnic, tribal, cultural, and religious divides that exist in Europe and their impact on internal and regional stability.

Concentration Requirements (24 semester hours)

IRLS300Comparative Political Systems3
IRLS344European Politics3
IRLS392Globalization and the Market Economy3
IRLS412Comparative Foreign Policy3
Select 4 courses from the following:12
French I
French II
German I
German II
Political Geography
Government and Security of Russia
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)
Russian I
Total Semester Hours24

Concentration in Globalization and Human Security (24 semester hours)

Takes an historical look at human rights topics and discusses how human rights and human security are intertwined. Delves into environmental security threats such as climate change, water scarcity, consumption patterns, urbanization, food security, and globalization. Some courses in this concentration may lead to eligibility to obtain a certificate of completion from the United Nation's Peace Operations Training Institute.

Objectives

Students in this concentration undertake an in-depth examination of security in all its forms. Students will learn how to think about security as more than protecting the nation state from external threats. By focusing on myriad threats faced by individuals and communities, students will develop a thorough understanding of security as a complex web of economic, environmental, food, health, personal, community, and political dimensions and will be able to:

  • Identify the major security threats and opportunities facing the global civil society.
  • Describe the interconnected political, social, cultural, and economic forces that affect human security.
  • Analyze the various methods designed to increase human security. 

Concentration Requirements (24 semester hours)

IRLS310Introduction to Human Security3
IRLS400Human Rights3
IRLS405National and Transnational Justice3
IRLS409Environmental Security3
Select 4 courses from the following:12
International Criminal Organizations
Terrorism and U.S. National Security
International Conflict Resolution
Principles of Peacekeeping
International Civil Order
Total Semester Hours24

Concentration in International Studies (24 semester hours)

Takes an historical look at human rights topics and discusses how human rights and human security are intertwined. Delves into environmental security threats such as climate change, water scarcity, consumption patterns, urbanization, food security, and globalization. Some courses in this concentration may lead to eligibility to obtain a certificate of completion from the United Nation's Peace Operations Training Institute.

Objectives

Students in this concentration undertake an in-depth examination of international and transnational issues that affect the global community as a whole and nation-states as individual entities and will be able to:

  • Comprehend various theories about the nature of conflict and cooperation in the post-Cold War era.
  • Explore the norms and purposes of international structures and regimes.
  • Identify the various manifestations of globalization and its impact on various political, economic and social systems. 

Concentration Requirements (24 semester hours)

INTL434Threat Analysis3
IRLS392Globalization and the Market Economy3
IRLS413International Conflict Resolution3
SCMT319Global Terrorism3
Select 4 courses from the following:12
International Criminal Organizations
Terrorism and U.S. National Security
Human Rights
National and Transnational Justice
International Civil Order
Special Topics in International Relations
International Trade and Regulations
Total Semester Hours24

Concentration in Latin American Studies (24 semester hours)

Explores the history, tenets, and central practices of Latin American cultures, as well as various sociological, economic, geographic, political, and defense factors as they relate to current events. Also discusses ethnic, tribal, cultural, and religious divides that exist in Latin America, their impact on internal and regional stability, and key issues that lie ahead for relations within regions.

Objectives

Students in this concentration will undertake an in-depth examination of issues that affect the Latin American community and will be able to:

  • Compare and contrast the history, essential tenets, and central practices of different cultures within various Latin American societies.
  • Explain the historical, sociological, economic, geographic, political, and defense factors as they relate to current events within Latin America.
  • Discuss the key issues that lie ahead for Latin American relations within the regions, but externally as well.
  • Assess the ethnic, tribal, cultural, and religious divides that exist in Latin America and their affect on internal and regional stability.

Concentration Requirements (24 semester hours)

IRLS300Comparative Political Systems3
IRLS355Latin American Politics3
IRLS392Globalization and the Market Economy3
IRLS412Comparative Foreign Policy3
Select 4 courses from the following:12
History of Latin America
Political Geography
Introduction to Human Security
Spanish I
Spanish II
Total Semester Hours24

Concentration in Peacekeeping (24 semester hours)

Traces the principles and foundations of peace operations within the context of international and regional mechanisms. Topics include the nature of conflict and diplomatic negotiations in the post-Cold War era, and the role of UN and regional peacekeeping initiatives in specific peacebuilding and peacekeeping operations in conflict areas. Completion of this concentration may lead to eligibility to obtain a certificate of completion from the Peace Operations Training Institute.

Objectives

Students in this concentration undertake an in-depth study of the principles and foundations of peace operations within the context of international and regional mechanisms. The student gains valuable insight into the skills necessary to step into international incidents between countries and among peacemakers to assist in the resolution of difficult problems and will be able to:

  • Understand the nature of conflict and diplomatic negotiations in the post-Cold War era.
  • Identify the evolving theory and practices of United Nations peacekeeping operations.
  • Describe the role of UN and regional peacekeeping initiatives in specific peace-building, peacemaking, and peace-keeping operations in conflict areas. 

Concentration Requirements (24 semester hours)

IRLS310Introduction to Human Security3
IRLS414Principles of Peacekeeping3
IRLS415Peacekeeping Logistics3
MILH422History of Peacekeeping: 1988-Present3
Select 4 courses from the following:12
National and Transnational Justice
Environmental Security
International Conflict Resolution
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)
International Civil Order
Total Semester Hours24

Final Program Requirements (3 semester hours)

IRLS492Senior Seminar in International Relations (to be taken as the last course before graduation)3
Total Semester Hours3
1

Prerequisite: Senior Standing and completion of all major courses prior to enrollment.

Elective Requirements (45 semester hours)

Select any courses that have not been used to fulfill major requirements. Credits applied toward a minor or certificate in an unrelated field may be used to fulfill elective credit for the major.