The Bachelor of Arts in History degree explores history's fascinating events, people, and cultures that determined the course of modern civilization. Whether you’re interested in the Antiquities, Western Civilization, Colonial or American History, the Civil War, World War II, the Cold War, Middle East history, or an analysis of Iran, this dynamic history program offers compelling choices. This bachelor’s program emphasizes critical and analytical thinking, and effective research and writing skills. Graduates with history degrees can be found as curators, archivists, educators, or in professions involving research, writing, editing, advocacy, politics, or historical preservation.

Many university faculty members teaching these courses are published historians who bring unique perspectives and relevant research into the classroom. You’ll also connect and interact online with other students who share your enthusiasm for history.

Degree Program Objectives

In addition to the institutional and general education level learning objectives, the Bachelor of Arts in History also seeks the following specific learning outcomes of its graduates. With reference to each of the respective areas of history, graduates in this degree program will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of key historical facts, values, and ideas that have shaped civilizations throughout history.
  • Analyze primary sources in their historical context.
  • Analyze secondary sources and identify various approaches to historical interpretation through critical reading.
  • Evaluate historical arguments based on primary sources and the historical method.
  • Demonstrate ability to conduct independent historical research in primary and secondary sources and complete a major research paper.

Degree at a Glance

General Education Requirements30
Major Required9
Select one of the following concentrations:39
Final Program Requirements6
Elective Requirements36
Total Semester Hours120

Degree Program Requirements

 

General Education Requirements (30 semester hours)

Arts and Humanities (6 semester hours) 1
Select 2 courses from the following:6
Art Appreciation
Film and Literature
Image Enhancement using Adobe Photoshop
World Literature through the Renaissance
World Literature since the Renaissance
English Literature: Beowulf to18th Century
English Literature: 18th Century to Present
American Literature before The Civil War
American Literature from The Civil War to Present
Arabic I
Arabic II
French I
French II
German I
German II
Introduction to Japanese
Music Appreciation
Introduction to Philosophy
Critical Thinking
Introduction to Ethics
Philosophy of Science
Introduction to Brazilian Portuguese
Introduction to World Religions
Russian I
Spanish I
Spanish II
Civics, Political and Social Sciences (6 semester hours) 1
Select 2 courses from the following:6
Introduction to Anthropology
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Human Sexuality
Social Media and Society
Intercultural Communication
Microeconomics
Macroeconomics
Humane Education: A Global Interdisciplinary Perspective
Introduction to Geography
Practical Food Safety and Awareness
International Relations I
Contemporary World Culture Through Literature
Cultural Diversity in Contemporary American Literature
American Government I
Introduction to Psychology
Introduction to Sociology
Social Problems
American Popular Culture
Communication: Writing, Oral, and Multimedia (8 semester hours)
COMM110Information & Digital Literacy2
ENGL110Making Writing Relevant3
Select 1 course from the following:3
Public Speaking
Effectiveness in Writing
Composition and Literature
Technical Writing
Scientific Writing
Business Writing
Human Relations Communication
Information Literacy and Global Citizenship
Introduction to Information Technology Writing
Human Relations
History (3 semester hours)
Select 1 course from the following:3
American History to 1877
American History since 1877
Western Civilization before The Thirty Years War
Western Civilization since The Thirty Years War
African-American History before 1877
African-American History since 1877
History of the American Indian
History of Science
Mathematics and Applied Reasoning (3 semester hours)
Select 1 course from the following:3
Accounting for Non Accounting Majors
Fundamentals of Programming
College Algebra
College Trigonometry
Introduction to Statistics
Math for Liberal Arts Majors
Calculus
Natural Sciences with Lab (4 semester hours)
Select 1 course from the following:4
Habitable Worlds Are We Alone with Lab
Introduction to Biology with Lab
Introduction to Chemistry with Lab
Introduction to Human Anatomy & Physiology with Lab
Introduction to Physics with Lab
Introduction to Astronomy with Lab
Introduction to Meteorology with Lab
Introduction to Environmental Science with Lab
Total Semester Hours30
1

All literature courses require successful completion of ENGL101 - Proficiency in Writing or ENGL110 - Making Writing Relevant .

Major Required (9 semester hours)

HIST111World Civilization before 16503
HIST112World Civilization since 16503
HIST300Research Methods in History3
Total Semester Hours9

Students must choose a concentration for this degree program and may select from a General Concentration, Concentration in American History, Concentration in European History, or Concentration in Global History.

General Concentration (39 semester hours)

Students who pursue a General History Concentration are exposed to the social impact, consequences, and changes of various pivotal historical events. They will learn critical and analytical thinking and effective writing and research methods. Students study the philosophies, personalities, strategies, leadership, and other factors that influenced the world. Topics cover American History, Ancient and Classical History, Diplomatic History, and Global Cultures and History.

Objectives

Upon completion of this concentration, students will be able to:

  • Identify a broad knowledge of historical literature that pertains to the topic of study included in the degree program.
  • Describe and locate the linkage between historical studies and allied disciplines.
  • Compare and contrast the historical experiences that go beyond a single time period and national or cultural experience.
  • Interpret historical forces that have shaped social change and contemporary human problems.
  • Analyze history from diverse perspectives of ancient and contemporary historical cultures, nations, and regions.
  • Analyze history from in-depth study of one or more periods, cultures, nations, regions, or seminal events.
  • Analyze historical material to make judgments, to establish causal relationships between facts, to find order and patterns, and to answer why and how - not just simply report.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of history as a creative art, a subjective discipline and an imaginative interpretation of the past.

Concentration Requirements (39 semester hours)

HIST230History of East Asia3
HIST301Ancient Greece3
HIST302Ancient Rome3
HIST402Colonial America3
HIST403The Early Republic, 1783-18153
HIST406Civil War And Reconstruction, 1861-18773
HIST350History of the Middle East3
HIST310History of Modern Europe3
HIST408The United States: 1900 to Second World War3
HIST409The United States: WW II to the Present3
Select 3 courses from the following:9
The Middle Ages
The Renaissance
France in the Age of Enlightenment
The British Empire
The Age of Dictators: Europe 1914-1945
History of European Colonialism
Special Topic: History
Independent Study: History
Total Semester Hours39

Concentration in American History (39 semester hours)

A student enrolled in the Concentration in American History is recommended to take HIST101 - American History to 1877, and HIST102 - American History after 1877.

Students who pursue a concentration in American History will concentrate on American history from the Colonial Period to the present. Students study the philosophies, personalities, strategies, leadership, and other factors that influenced the United States. Topics cover foreign policy and military operations as well as the domestic political, economic, and social components of America. 

Objectives

Upon completion of this concentration, students will be able to:

  • Compare and contrast the philosophy of early American leaders and how this resulted in a break from the British Empire.
  • Analyze the reasons America pushed westward and what that expansion entailed.
  • Identify and give examples of the causes of the Civil War.
  • Differentiate the outcomes of the Civil War in the North and the South.
  • Assess the social, economic, and political situation in America leading up to the 20th century.
  • Expound upon the technical revolution in America at the turn of the 20th Century.
  • Identify the causes of the Great Depression and recognize the attempts that were made to bring America out of it.
  • Analyze America's reasoning for joining both World Wars.
  • Elaborate on the political background of the Cold War and what factors led to the diplomatic meltdown between the United States and the Soviet Union.
  • Integrate the cultural revolution of the 1960s and what was happening in Vietnam.
  • Identify major political, cultural, and economic developments in the 1980s, 1990s, and in the 21st Century.

Concentration Requirements (39 semester hours)

HIST402Colonial America3
MILH320The American Revolution3
HIST403The Early Republic, 1783-18153
HIST404Jacksonian America, 1815-18463
HIST405Antebellum America, 1846-18613
HIST406Civil War And Reconstruction, 1861-18773
HIST407The Gilded Age, 1877-19003
HIST408The United States: 1900 to Second World War3
MILH360World War II3
HIST409The United States: WW II to the Present3
Select 3 courses from the following:9
History of the Holocaust
Ancient Greece
Ancient Rome
The Middle Ages
France in the Age of Enlightenment
The British Empire
History of European Colonialism
History of Modern Europe
History of Russia
History of Africa
History of the Middle East
Asia and the Modern World
Special Topic: History
Independent Study: History
World War I
Total Semester Hours39

Concentration in European History

A student enrolled in the Concentration of European History is recommended to take HIST121 - Western Civilization before The Thirty Years’ Wars, and HIST122 – Western Civilization after the Thirty Years’ War as part of their General Education Requirements.

Students who pursue a concentration in European History will focus on developments that took place in Europe from ancient Greece to the present. Students will study the political, philosophical, scientific, and social changes that laid the foundation for early Europe to the key developments that led to the major European wars of the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics concentrate on the development of political, economic, and cultural institutions in early European societies and the rise of Europe as a global power in the modern period.

Objectives

Upon completion of this concentration, students will be able to:

  • Identify and discuss the major political, cultural, economic and military developments of Rome and Greece.
  • Trace the rise and accomplishments of Byzantium and its changing relationship with Islam.
  • Examine the rise of the Ottoman Empire as a European power.
  • State the factors that brought Europe out of the Dark Ages. Analyze the key developments of the Renaissance, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, and Europe’s Age of Discovery, and identify individuals who contributed to the artistic and cultural rebirth.
  • Expound on the causes and effect of the Industrial Revolution, and infer the importance of trade to the development of European powers.
  • Summarize Napoleon's rise to power and identify the shift to Nationalism.
  • Identify key political figures in 20th Century Europe and describe the shift to Nationalism.
  • Describe the political and social causes of World War I and World War II, and state the social and economic implications of these wars.
  • Describe the creation of the League of Nations, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and the United Nations (UN) and identify their purposes.
  • Examine the causes of the Cold War and identify major political, cultural, and economic developments during this time.

Concentration Requirements (39 semester hours)

HIST301Ancient Greece3
HIST302Ancient Rome3
HIST303The Middle Ages3
HIST304The Renaissance3
HIST305France in the Age of Enlightenment3
MILH365The Napoleonic Wars and the Long Peace3
HIST306The British Empire3
HIST307The Age of Dictators: Europe 1914-19453
HIST308History of European Colonialism3
HIST310History of Modern Europe3
Select 3 courses from the following:9
History of Africa
History of the Middle East
History of Latin America
Asia and the Modern World
Colonial America
The Early Republic, 1783-1815
Jacksonian America, 1815-1846
Antebellum America, 1846-1861
Civil War And Reconstruction, 1861-1877
The Gilded Age, 1877-1900
The United States: 1900 to Second World War
The United States: WW II to the Present
The Cold War
Special Topic: History
Independent Study: History
World War I
World War II
Diplomacy and War I
Diplomacy and War II
Total Semester Hours39

Concentration in Global History (39 semester hours)

Students enrolled in the Concentration in Global History will examine the major events, personalities, and accomplishments that have taken place in all regions of the world from pre-history until the present. Students will study the political, philosophical, scientific, and social changes that shaped the history of Europe, Asia, Africa, and the New World. Special emphasis will be placed on how these regions interacted with one another over the millennia to create the modern world.

Objectives

Upon completion of this concentration, students will be able to:

  • Identify significant personalities and events in world history.
  • Explain the rise and spread of the major world religions.
  • Identify the invention, diffusion, and impact of major technological innovations through history.
  • Describe the patterns of migration and relationship between nomadic cultures and civilization.
  • Trace the emergence of Afro-Eurasian trading networks before Europe's Age of Discovery and emerging patterns of world trade in the early modern period.
  • Explain Europe's scientific, political, and industrial revolutions and the impact of Western political and economic influence in the world.
  • Assess the rise and spread of Western hegemony and the reaction of non-Western cultures and civilizations to Western contacts, intrusions, and colonization during the 19th and 20th centuries.
  • Trace the patterns and problems of decolonization and the rise and fall of Communism and the emergence of a multi-polar world in the 21st century.
  • Analyze the United States' emergence as a world power after two world wars and the rise of the Pacific Rim. 

Concentration Requirements (39 semester hours)

HIST230History of East Asia3
HIST340History of Africa3
HIST350History of the Middle East3
HIST308History of European Colonialism3
HIST306The British Empire3
HIST360History of Latin America3
HIST320History of Russia3
HIST310History of Modern Europe3
MILH355World War I3
MILH360World War II3
Select 3 courses from the following:9
Ancient Greece
Ancient Rome
The United States: 1900 to Second World War
The United States: WW II to the Present
Globalization and the Market Economy
The Third World: Dependency and Development
Special Topic: History
Independent Study: History
Total Semester Hours39

Final Program Requirements (6 semester hours)

HIST491Writing a Research Proposal3
HIST498Senior Seminar in History (to be taken as the last course before graduation) 13
Total Semester Hours6
1

Prerequisite: HIST491 - Writing a Research Proposal and Senior Standing and completion of all major courses prior to enrollment. May not be taken concurrently with HIST491.

Elective Requirements (36 semester hours)

Select any courses that have not been used to fulfill major requirements. Credits applied toward a minor or certificate in an unrelated field may be used to fulfill elective credit for the major.