The Bachelor of Arts in Entrepreneurship offers you a practical, hands-on understanding of what it takes to be a successful entrepreneur in today’s competitive marketplace. You’ll learn about leveraging business opportunities into viable business entities as you study idea generation, marketing, management, operations, capital funding, and the legal aspects of beginning a new venture. This bachelor’s degree program is ideal if you plan to start your own venture, take over a family-owned company, or work within a startup organization.

Degree Program Objectives

In addition to the institutional and degree level learning objectives, graduates of this program are expected to achieve these learning outcomes:

  • Identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats in the product, service, or nonprofit environments.
  • Design an appropriate business strategy to support an entrepreneurial business based on research, critical thinking, and leadership skills.
  • Evaluate analytical skills necessary to operate a business efficiently and effectively that meet strategic planning and goals.
  • Interpret concepts of contract, tort, Uniform Commercial Code (UCC), regulations, and employment law to entrepreneurial business enterprises.
  • Recommend various methods necessary to grow an entrepreneurial venture through financial analysis and capital funding options.

Degree at a Glance

General Education Requirements30
Major Required39
Select one of the following concentrations:12
Final Program Requirements3
Elective Requirements36
Total Semester Hours120

Degree Program Requirements

General Education Requirements (30 semester hours)

Arts and Humanities (6 semester hours) 1
Select 2 courses from the following:6
Arabic I
Arabic II
Art Appreciation
Film and Literature
Image Enhancement using Adobe Photoshop
French I
French II
German I
German II
Introduction to Japanese
Literature of American Encounters, Revolution, and Rebellion
From Abolition to #MeToo: Literature of the American Civil Rights Movement
Pivotal Figures in Early British Literature
British Literature from Wordsworth through the Wasteland
Leadership in World Literature: Antiquity to the Early Modern Period
Literature of the Newly Globalized World: The Individual’s Struggle to Adapt
Music Appreciation
World Music and Cultures
Introduction to Philosophy
Critical Thinking
Introduction to Ethics
Philosophy of Science
Introduction to Brazilian Portuguese
Introduction to World Religions
Russian I
Spanish I
Spanish II
Thinking and Acting Ethically
Civics, Political and Social Sciences (6 semester hours) 1
Select 2 courses from the following:6
Introduction to Anthropology
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Human Sexuality
Social Media and Society
Intercultural Communication
Microeconomics
Macroeconomics
Microeconomics for Business
Macroeconomics for Business
Humane Education: A Global Interdisciplinary Perspective
Introduction to Geography
Practical Food Safety and Awareness
International Relations I
Forgotten America--Under Represented Cultures in American Literature
Four Points of the Compass: Culture and Society Around the World
Introduction to Political Science
American Government I
Introduction to Psychology
Introduction to Sociology
Social Problems
American Popular Culture
Exploring Society and Cultures via Science Fiction
Communication: Writing, Oral, and Multimedia (9 semester hours)
COMM120Information and Digital Literacy3
ENGL110Making Writing Relevant3
Select 1 course from the following:3
Public Speaking
Proficiency in Writing
Argumentation and Rhetoric
Introduction to Literature
Technical Writing
Scientific Writing
Effective Business Communication
Human Relations Communication
Information Literacy and Global Citizenship
Introduction to Information Technology Writing
Human Relations
History (3 semester hours)
Select 1 course from the following:3
American History to 1877
American History since 1877
World Civilization before 1650
World Civilization since 1650
Western Civilization before The Thirty Years War
Western Civilization since The Thirty Years War
African-American History before 1877
African-American History since 1877
History of the American Indian
History of Science
The History and Context of STEM
Mathematics and Applied Reasoning (3 semester hours)
MATH120Introduction to Statistics3
Natural Sciences (3 semester hours)
Select 1 course from the following:3
Introduction to Biology
Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology
Introduction to Chemistry
Introduction to Meteorology
Introduction to Geology
Introduction to Environmental Science
Introduction to Physics
Introduction to Astronomy
Introduction to STEM Disciplines
Total Semester Hours30

Major Required (39 semester hours)

ACCT105Accounting for Non Accounting Majors3
ENTR150Idea Generation3
ENTR215Innovation Design and Prototyping3
ENTR210Entrepreneurs as Leaders3
ENTR300Foundations of Entrepreneurship3
ENTR311Business Plan Foundations3
ENTR427Technological Innovation3
ENTR320Practical Law for the Entrepreneur3
ENTR315Financing a New Venture3
ENTR410Money Management for Entrepreneurs3
ENTR426Strategic Growth3
ENTR416Innovative Marketing3
ENTR312Social Entrepreneurship3
Total Semester Hours39

Students must choose a concentration for this degree program and may select from a General concentration, Concentration in Business Analytics, Concentration in Food and Beverage Industry, Concentration in Retail Industry, Concentration in Small Business, or Concentration in Sports Fitness.

General Concentration (12 semester hours)

This concentration is designed to equip graduates with a practical, hands-on understanding of what it takes to run a successful business in today’s business environment. Students will learn about leveraging and a variety of business opportunities into viable business entities. Studies include marketing, management, operations, finance, accounting, and the legal aspects of running a business. This concentration is applicable for any student who has a desire to start theirown business, plans to take over a family owned business, or otherwise works in an entrepreneurial enterprise.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this concentration, the student will be able to:

  • Discuss economic factors associated with government, business, and consumer environments and apply theoretical techniques to analyze markets.
  • Apply concepts of contract, tort, Uniform Commercial Code (UCC), and property law to entrepreneurial business enterprises.
  • Compose an entrepreneurial business strategy based on in depth analysis of internal and external factors and competitive and environmental forces.
  • Apply critical thinking and decision-making skills by collecting data through various research tools in order to develop alternatives and solve problems objectively.
  • Practice quantitative skills necessary in to grow an entrepreneurial business through work in accounting, finance, and statistics.
  • Develop a marketing plan to support an entrepreneurial business that leverages its overall business strategy.
  • Practice analytical skills necessary to operate a business efficiently and effectively.

Concentration Requirements (12 semester hours)

ENTR216Service Innovation and Delivery3
ENTR310The Family Owned Business3
ENTR313Non-Profit Entrepreneurship3
ENTR421The Value of Networking3
Total Semester Hours12

Concentration in Business Analytics (12 semester hours)

This concentration provides the student with an array of study and course work in business analytics, tools to use for analytics, decision-making, and applied analytics.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this concentration, the student will be able to:

  • Compare operational statistical theories and software options for objective decision-making.
  • Use managerial level statistical methods to integrate into objective decision-making processes.
  • Apply analytical concepts to support decision-making.

Concentration Requirements (12 semester hours)

BUSN250Analytics I3
BUSN350Analytics II3
BUSN450Advanced Analytics3
ANLY460Applied Analytics I3
Total Semester Hours12

Concentration in Food and Beverage Industry (12 semester hours)

The restaurant industry is the second largest private-sector employer in the United States, and it adds jobs at a stronger rate than all other industries combined. By 2023, the restaurant industry is projected to add 1.3 million jobs (National Restaurant Association, 2015). In 2015 alone, restaurants are expected to add over 300,000 jobs. Further, restaurant industry sales account for 4% of the U.S. gross GDP. Starting and owning their own food and/or drink establishment is one of the top three goals of our current entrepreneurship students.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this concentration, the student will be able to:

  • Recognize skills and knowledge necessary to advance within the food and service industry.
  • Design food safety techniques that can be used to prevent the outbreak of foodborne illness.
  • Describe typical production and service positions.
  • Describe procedures for serving alcohol with care.
  • Describe food service industry trends in nutrition and health.
  • Develop a nutritional plan using the four characteristics of a nutritious diet.
  • Design and implement cost control systems as they relate to foodservice operations.
  • Evaluate the manager’s role in establishing service standards and develop methods to motivate employees to keep the customer’s dining experience at the highest priority.
  • Develop menus, and analyze recipes, their structures and conversion properties.
  • Demonstrate the ability to evaluate design proposals prepared by professionals in relation to principles of effective design.

Concentration Requirements (12 semester hours)

Select 4 courses from the following:12
Food and Beverage Management
Quantity Food Preparation
Principles of Cost Control in Foodservice Operations
Nutrition in the Food Service Industry
History and Culture of Wine
Foodservice Facilities Design
Total Semester Hours12

Concentration in Retail Industry (12 semester hours)

As the retail industry grows, innovation will be key to growth, expansion, and survival. To grow and differentiate, retailers need to look beyond traditional formats, products, and services, according to Deloitte's 2015 Retail Industry Outlook. According to the National Retail Federation, Retail directly and indirectly supports 42 million jobs, provides $1.6 trillion in labor income and contributes $2.6 trillion annually to U.S. GDP. Further, close to 40% of all retail employees work for small business retailers.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this concentration, the student will be able to:

  • Define the importance of retail strategy formulation and the impact of retailing on the economy in the global environment.
  • Examine and identify the retailing process and how today’s managers assess and implement strategies used in the management of information technology, financial, and human resources.
  • Explore and examine analytical techniques for diagnosing the competitive position of retail focused strategy, and identifying and analyzing specific retail options.
  • Explore and examine major differences between a successful versus poorly run retail operation to include visual communication, store design, employee recruitment, and consumer value propositions.
  • Explore and examine the many factors of merchandise blending and how to determine which components are needed for successful assortments for the consumer.
  • Explore and examine the dynamic and competitive nature of the retail industry.

Concentration Requirements (12 semester hours)

Select 4 courses from the following:12
Retail Organization Fundamentals
Customer Relations
Retail Inventory Management
Risk Management
Retail Strategy
Retail Innovation
Retail Operations
Retail Merchandising Operations
Total Semester Hours12

Concentration in Small Business (12 semester hours)

This concentration is designed for students who want to focus on being a small business owner. Graduates examine leadership, customer service, operations, social media, and marketing specific to a small business. Developed to bring specialized knowledge to entrepreneurs, this program will expose students to key concepts and principles to be a successful small business owner.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this concentration, the student will be able to:

  • Summarize employment practices for small business owners.
  • Recommend a customer service model for a new small business.
  • Conduct appropriate marketing functions for your business venture.
  • Assess relevant areas for cost improvement for a small business.

Concentration Requirements (12 semester hours)

Select 4 courses from the following:12
Leadership in Small Business Ventures
Small Business Customer Service
Marketing the Successful Small Business
Social Media to Grow Small Business
Operating a Small Business
Virtual Small Business
Total Semester Hours12

Concentration in Sports Fitness (12 semester hours)

The fitness industry is growing and many individuals express an interest in being an entrepreneur in this field. Research shows growth estimates ranging from 9.76 billion dollars in 2008 to a $24 billion industry today. The fitness industry services some 51 million Americans of all ages and income levels. The fitness industry has been forecasted to grow 23% by 2025 and encompasses different types of gyms. Sports fitness is a growing industry due in part to increased awareness of health and wellness. In this concentration, students will focus on wellness, conditioning, trends, and culture.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this concentration, the student will be able to:

  • Discuss factors affecting endurance training and methods for developing endurance.
  • Examine the body's responses to weight training, training and conditioning, and strength training exercises.
  • Analyze the health benefits gained from strength training.
  • Apply concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention.
  • Design a functional training program.
  • Examine the issues and trends associated with fitness and wellness.

Concentration Requirements (12 semester hours)

Select 4 courses from the following:12
Wellness: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
Foundations of Nutrition
Exercise Programming and Testing
Business Aspects of Fitness and Wellness
Current Issues and Trends in Fitness and Wellness
Sports and Recreation Facility Management
Total Semester Hours12

Final Program Requirements (3 semester hours)

ENTR498Entrepreneurship Senior Capstone (to be taken as the last course before graduation) 13
Total Semester Hours3

Elective Requirements (36 semester hours)

Select any courses that have not been used to fulfill major requirements. Credits applied toward a minor or certificate in an unrelated field may be used to fulfill elective credit for the major.